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OSS and Sharing Leftovers

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OSS
  • Best open source cloud-storage services

    Worried about storing your private files with data-hungry tech giants such as Google and Microsoft? Here are three open source alternatives

  • New Open-Source Software SHARPy Launched

    The Aeroelastics Research Group has launched an open-source software tool – SHARPy

    The tool offers dynamic simulation for everything from wind turbines to solar-powered aircraft.

    SHARPy (which stands for Simulation of High-Aspect Ratio aeroplanes in Python) is a dynamic aeroelasticity simulation package. It offers structural, aerodynamic and coupled aeroelastic/flight dynamics analysis, and has particular application for low-speed and very flexible aircraft, and for wind turbines.

  • Iowa Caucus App Fiasco Shows Need for Open Source Transparency

    The Iowa caucuses were thrown into disarray as reports surfaced an opaque app used to tabulate the results and report them to Democratic Party officials was reporting only part of the required data. Although the app had been developed to improve efficiency in communicating the final caucus tallies, it ended up causing significant delays. According to security experts, the incident served to highlight the risks of relying on digital systems and the centralization of information, and a lack of transparency regarding these systems.

  • How to Vet the Engineering Chops of Your Software Vendors

    After witnessing the debacle in Iowa, campaign decision-makers across the country are wondering just how good is the engineering behind the software they purchase for their campaigns? And for good reason: the stakes couldn’t be higher.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: OWASP SAMM

    The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) has announced version 2 of the Software Assurance Maturity Model (SAMM). SAMM is an open-source framework that enables teams and developers to assess, formulate and implement better security strategies that can be integrated into the software development life cycle.

  • Austin Alexander Burridge of Rosemount Compares Open-Source and Proprietary Software Security

    When open-source software developers are made aware of a specific security vulnerability or bug in their software products, they often publish the vulnerability to the community. If there's a developer who wants to offer a fix, he can build one and publish it as a particular version. If there's no funding to develop an upgrade, an IT professional is still aware of the problem so that he can create a custom workaround for his company's unique system until an updated version of the software becomes available.

  • Robust security crucial for adoption of open source

    New Delhi [India], Feb 11 (ANI/NewsVoir): While speaking at the inaugural session of the "3rd Open Source Summit 2020" recently in New Delhi, Vivek Banzal, Director (CFA), Bharat Sachar Nigam Limited (BSNL) said that it is a challenge to keep pace with the technology, more so when security of data has to be quite robust.

    [...]

    "The Government of India has encouraged the adoption of this technology in the Digital India initiative and this has further encouraged the CIO's of enterprises and other government organizations to make a move towards Open source technology. The rise of digital transformation in India has pushed the adoption of open source both by enterprises and government," said Sunil Kumar, Deputy Director-General, National Informatics Centre (NIC), while commenting on the adoption of Open source by the Government to India.

  • Leaders share how agencies bring agility into application development

    Additionally, tapping into open source development communities allows them to overcome some of chronic IT skills gaps many agencies continue to face.

    [...]

    Open source is being used both in civilian and defense agencies. Even though open source code is used for unclassified applications, it does not mean it’s unsecure, assures Michael Kanaan, co-chair of artificial intelligence and machine learning for the U.S. Air Force.

  • The Top 13 Free and Open Source RPA Tools

    Searching for Robotic Process Automation (RPA) software can be a daunting (and expensive) process, one that requires long hours of research and deep pockets. The most popular RPA tools often provide more than what’s necessary for non-enterprise organizations, with advanced functionality relevant to only the most technically savvy users. Thankfully, there are a number of free and open source RPA tools out there. Some of these solutions are offered by vendors looking to eventually sell you on their enterprise product, and others are maintained and operated by a community of developers looking to democratize robotic process automation.

    In this article, we will examine free and open source RPA tools, first by providing a brief overview of what to expect and also with short blurbs of the options currently available in the space. This is the most complete and up-to-date directory on the web.

  • The Two Faces of Open Source: ECT News Roundtable, Episode 5

    The open source software movement has evolved dramatically over the past two decades. Many businesses that once considered open source a threat now recognize its value.

    On the other hand, in spite of increased enthusiasm among enterprises, consumer interest by and large has not materialized.

    With large companies increasingly embracing open source, what does it mean to be a part of the free and open source software, or FOSS, "community"?

  • Pimcore’s free, open source digital experience platform - a rock tossed into the CX pond?

    The retail and eCommerce landscapes have changed dramatically over the past decade as customer experience has risen to the forefront of enterprise marketing priorities. Marketers have turned their focus away from price as the key driver of sales to their ability to deliver the most convenient, streamlined and personalized experiences across channels whether online, in-store, or on mobile phones.

    [...]

    Their solution Pimcore, introduced in 2013, is a free open source software platform for managing digital data and customer experiences for any channel, device, or industry.

  • Chef Serves Up Partner Program to Push Open DevOps Model

    Aims to help channel sell 100% open-source portfolio

  • Chef Introduces New Global Partner Program Purpose-Built for 100 Percent Open Source Software

    Chef, the leader in DevOps, today announced a new channel program specifically designed to ensure that partners and customers are able to take maximum advantage of Chef’s 100 percent open source business model. The Chef Partner Program (CPP) creates three tiers of partners -- Principal, Senior and Junior -- with the highest benefits and incentives applied to those who drive the strongest results for themselves and their mutual enterprise customers using Chef Enterprise Automation Stack.

  • CableLabs, Altran team to take open source to the edge

    Altran and CableLabs have teamed up on "Project Adrenaline," an open source initiative that aims to help the cable industry build and manage edge networks and smooth the path for apps that can run on them.

    And while Adrenaline is initially focused on cable, the broader aim is to apply the resulting open source platform to multiple industries while still staying aligned with Kubernetes.

  • Building even more of LibreOffice with Meson, now with graphics

    Note that this contains only the main deliverables, i.e. the shared libraries and executables. Unit tests and the like are not converted apart from a few sample tests.

    It was mentioned in an earlier blog post that platform abstraction layers are the trickiest ones to build. This turns out to be the case here also. LO has at least three such frameworks (depending on how you count them). SAL is the very basic layer, UNO is a component model used to, for example, expose functionality to Java. Finally VCL is the GUI toolkit abstraction layer. Now that we have the GUI toolkit and its GTK plugin built we can build a VCL sample application and launch it. It looks like this:

  • XSS vulnerability patched in TinyMCE

    A security update has been released for the popular open source text editor TinyMCE after a researcher discovered a a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability impacting three of its plugins.

  • Should You Opt For An Open-Source LMS [Ed: The proprietary software LMS vendors badmouthing Free software as if that means "no support" (which is exactly the opposite of what's true, the support of the lifeline of the developers)]

    In the modern world, organizations are increasingly using learning management systems (LMS) for corporate training. However, with the availability of both open-source LMS and commercial LMS, choosing the more appropriate one for your organization can be challenging.

    Although leading open-source industry pioneers such as Moodle has dominated eLearning over the past few years, many organizations still prefer proprietary LMS over open-source LMS. In this article, we have assessed both these options and jotted down the factors you must consider before making a decision.

  • Open Source Community Responds to Rapid Adoption of Tech in Financial Services as FINOS Announces New Fintech Members

    The companies include: EPAM Systems, Inc., a product development, digital platform engineering, and digital and product design agency; NearForm, an open source solutions design and delivery company; and CloudBees, a provider of DevOps solutions.

  • Finos welcomes new members

    Finos (Fintech Open Source Foundation), a nonprofit whose mission is to foster adoption of open source, open standards, and collaborative software development practices in financial services, today announces the addition of three established fintechs to its already growing membership roster of prestigious financial institutions, technology companies and global consultancies.

  • Open source licence series - Cockroach Labs: Scaling a sustainable open source business model

    Big cloud vendors have preyed upon open source R&D by providing open source software (OSS) software as-a-service to edge out small competitors. Combine that with the platform benefits of economies of scale and greater opportunities for integration… and you can see how the big cloud providers can drown open source startups.

    That said, companies eclipsing growth-stage and legacy companies looking to store mission-critical data in the cloud are becoming wary of big vendors not investing in their R&D.

  • Open source licence series - OpenStack Foundation: Protecting open source freedoms

    Reduced to its essence, free and open source software is defining a set of freedoms, encoded into software licences.

    The Open Source Initiative (OSI) maintains an open source definition and a list of compatible licences, with the double goal of guaranteeing those essential freedoms and rights… and facilitating adoption by limiting licence proliferation.

  • Open source energy modelling tool shows how to decarbonise Australia

    The future of Australia’s energy mix has spawned innumerable heated arguments over how to balance secure electricity supply with economic and environmental needs, prompting energy consultants ITP to launch an open source modelling tool to settle arguments and provide clarity.

    Inspired by similar open source models in Europe and North America, ITP launched the openCEM model as a free, transparent tool to cut through the complexity of Australia’s energy mix and how it can securely transition away from carbon.

    “ITP felt, as many have felt, that public discussions around renewables were fraught with many assumptions and made with few facts and little expertise,” ITP strategy group manager Oliver Woldring said.

    [..]

    Once openCEM is being used widely by policy makers and investors across Australia, ITP and ThoughtWorks aims to engage other markets across APAC and further afield, about creating tools to model uptakes of renewables into the grids of other countries.

  • Self-driving car dataset missing labels for pedestrians, cyclists

    A popular self-driving car dataset for training machine-learning systems – one that’s used by thousands of students to build an open-source self-driving car – contains critical errors and omissions, including missing labels for hundreds of images of bicyclists and pedestrians.

    Machine learning models are only as good as the data on which they’re trained. But when researchers at Roboflow, a firm that writes boilerplate computer vision code, hand-checked the 15,000 images in Udacity Dataset 2, they found problems with 4,986 – that’s 33% – of those images.

  • New Project Eyes an Open Platform for Data From mHealth Wearables

    A Massachusetts-based partnership aims to create a common workplace for healthcare providers and researchers using mHealth sensors in wearables and other devices.

    The Open Wearables Initiative (OWEAR), launched last September by Nextbridge Health, Shimmer Research and Dr. Vincent van Hees, announced that it is now “actively soliciting” open-source software and datasets from wearable sensors and other connected health technologies. The group wants to create a platform from which researchers and care providers can share digital health source codes and algorithms.

  • Monash Uni, Red Cross & Red Crescent team up on open-source video program

    Monash University’s Faculty of Information Technology (IT), the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) have announced that they have developed an innovative approach to empower communities around the world through development of a special video program.

    According to a joint statement from Monash, the Red Cross and Red Crescent some of the world’s most isolated and remote communities will now have the ability to share their stories and raise public awareness of the local issues they’re facing “through a unique open-source video program developed by Monash”.

More in Tux Machines

Games: ASCII, Carrion and Slippi

  • The 20 Best ASCII Games on Linux System in 2020

    If you are looking for the ASCII games on Linux, then you are in the right place. Who doesn’t love to play games? In this modern era, you have access to the various graphics-intensive games right into your mobile phone. If you own a latest-generation console or a monster gaming PC, then you are ahead of the time. You can play abundant games of different categories that almost look like real movies. [...] Linux is not a gaming platform. The gamers always lean towards a PlayStation, Xbox, or a Windows machine. But the ASCII games library on Linux is huge. Although, these are not like those AAA titles that everyone wants to play. Rather, these games will bring you back to childhood. [...] Well, trying to play modern games on Linux is not always possible. This is because of the lack of support. Besides, most of the Linux geeks use their Linux distros for their work purpose. Hence, if you want to try some games just for driving the boredom away, these can be some great options. ASCII games on Linux don’t require that much CPU, GPU, or RAM to run. Instead, they are of just a few kilobytes of size. Moreover, some of the games mentioned above will remind you of your childhood. Lastly, if you think that we missed your favorite ASCII game to include in this list, just let us know in the comment section. Happy gaming!

  • Carrion Launches July 23 for PC, Linux, Mac, Switch, and Xbox One

    Devolver Digital have confirmed the release date for Carrion, during the D3: Devolver Digital Direct pre-recorded press conference. This “reverse horror game” has you become a The Thing style monster- reaching out and munching on the personnel of the facility keeping you captive. Eat, grow, and evolve to gain new abilities, to bring more terror to your prey.

  • Play Smash Bros. Melee Online With Slippi

    For a game that’s nearly 20 years old, Super Smash Bros. Melee for the GameCube has still been a staple in the fighting game community. To this day some prefer Melee‘s more sophisticated mechanics over the other games in the Smash Bros. series; namely, L-canceling, wavedashing, being able to hog the ledge to prevent other recovering players from grabbing it, and other more complex additions. Brawl was too slow for some and introduced new mechanics that threw many veterans off. And even though Ultimate picked up the pace in terms of speed, the overall design of the game is to appeal to casual gamers; gamers who are new to the fighting genre. Fan-made mods like Project M and Project Plus have given players the itch that they wanted for Melee‘s mechanics, but as far as I know there’s no easy way to play online with other players.

today's howtos

Kernel: Rust, Language, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Linus Torvalds' Initial Comment On Rust Code Prospects Within The Linux Kernel

    Kernel developers appear to be eager to debate the merits of potentially allowing Rust code within the Linux kernel. Linus Torvalds himself has made some initial remarks on the topic ahead of the Linux Plumbers 2020 conference where the matter will be discussed at length. In the mailing list thread when discussing Greg Kroah-Hartman's past comments on the Rust prospects for the kernel, it was mentioned that one of the conditions being sought is that it would effectively be disabled by default until there has been sufficient testing.

  • Linux 5.8 Formally Adds The Inclusive Terminology Guidelines

    Merged overnight into the Linux kernel source tree are the new guidelines concerning the use of "inclusive terminology" for future code. It was just one week ago that the inclusive terminology guidelines for the Linux kernel were first proposed to mixed reaction and have now been merged into the source tree after receiving enough approval of various upstream kernel maintainers. [...] There are around 19.5k mentions of "slave" within the kernel source tree, mostly within the kernel networking code. The string "master" is mentioned some 26.9k times. For "blacklist" are around 888 mentions when checking in the current Git tree. Linux is currently at around 69.3k text files with around 3.54 million lines of code comments and 20.1 million lines of code (along with 3.6 million blank lines).

  • Linux team approves new terminology, bans terms like 'blacklist' and 'slave'

    Linus Torvalds approved on Friday a new and more inclusive terminology for the Linux kernel code and documentation. Going forward, Linux developers have been asked to use new terms for the master/slave and blacklist/whitelist terminologies.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Systems Boot and Security Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Systems Boot and Security Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference! Computer-system security is an important topic to many. Maintaining data security and system integrity is crucial for businesses and individuals. Computer security is paramount even at system boot up, as firmware attacks can compromise the system before the operating system starts. In order to keep the integrity of the system intact, both the firmware as well as the rest of the system must be vigilant in monitoring and preventing malware intrusion. As a result of last year’s microconference Oracle sent out patches to support Trenchboot in the Linux kernel and in GRUB2. An agreement was also reached on problems with TPM 2.0 Linux sysfs interface.

  • GNU Tools Track Added to Linux Plumbers Conference 2020

    We are pleased to announce that we have added an additional track to LPC 2020: the GNU Tools track. The track will run for the 5 days of the conference.

Programming: GNOME/GTK, GNU C Library, Perl and Python

  • Implementing Gtk based Container-Widget: Part — 2

    This write-up is in continuation of its previous part — setting up basic container functionality. In the past couple of weeks, we moved on from just adding children to actually repositioning them (child widgets of the container, NewWidget) when enough space is not available for all widget to fit in the given width. Though the grid structure is yet to put in place, the widget could be seen taking shape already (look at below gif).

  • This week in GNOME Builder #2

    This week we fixed some specific topics which were planned for the previous cycle. If anyone wants to contribute so see some of our “Builder wishlist” go there: Builder/ThreePointThirtyfive Last time i had forgotten to mention the great work of our translation team which contributed various translations to Builder. Thank you!

  • Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS CPUs Now Supported By GNU C Library

    The Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS is designed for high performance embedded environments with the 32-bit HS5x and 64-bit HS6x series. Synopsys has long offered their own GNU toolchain builds to support the DesignWare ARC hardware on Linux while now the mainline support is in good shape with glibc for the ARCv2 ISA having been mainlined. Though do note it's ARCv2 and not the latest ARCv3 ISA.

  • A FIXIT-dive into an old CPAN module

    Let’s have a thought experiment. Assume there is an Open Source-licensed Perl module published on CPAN that you care about, and that hasn’t had any updates in a very long time - what are your options? In this blog post, I’ll take a dive into this problem, and use the Geo::Postcodes::NO module as an example. As of this writing, the module version is 0.31, and it’s most recent release was in September 2006. [...] Contribution information for the module is missing (or at least, less than expected). The author ARNE has offered his email address, and after a quick search one can find his Github page. He hasn’t published this module there, though. If we are going to contribute with this, then just adding a CONTRIBUTING.md file is a probably a good place to start. If the module you are looking for has the same problem, then check out it’s “How to contribute” page on MetaCPAN (you can find a link to it in the menu there). There’s another issue though – we can’t offer a pull-request! At best we can send a patch(1) file attached to an email. While this is a bit old-school and should still work (assuming the author accepts those), there might be better options available.

  • Chapter 3 - Google Correlate example update

    In Chapter 3 on Page 87, the book refers to the Google Correlate service. However, as of December 2019, the service has been shutdown. Since the chapter requires you to download a CSV formatted data, it is no longer possible. However, you can instead download a version of the data that I had used 5 years back when writing the book from here.

  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 004 - Class Attributes and Inheritance

    Learnt about Class Attributes and Inheritance, today.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxv) stackoverflow python report