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Flatpak 1.6.2 Arrives to Fix Major Install Performance Issue

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Red Hat
Software

Flatpak maintainer Alexander Larsson released today Flatpak 1.6.2, the second maintenance update to the Flatpak 1.6 stable series that addresses some performance issues and other bugs.

The main change in Flatpak 1.6.2 is a fix for a major regression affecting the download speeds during the installation of Flatpak apps from Fluthub. Therefore, the devs recommend everyone to update to this version for a better and faster Flatpak app installation experience.

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Flatpak 1.6.2 Released To Fix Performance Regression

  • Flatpak 1.6.2 Released To Fix Performance Regression Of Slow Install Times

    Flatpak 1.6.2 is out and users are encouraged to upgrade due to a recent Flatpak + OSTree regression that leads to slow install times.

    Recent versions of OSTree with pre-1.6.2 Flatpak can lead to delta support being lost and thus performing full OSTree operations, which is particularly painful for large runtimes. This regression led to very slow Flatpak installations from the likes of Flathub, but now Flatpak 1.6.2 is out with corrected OSTree usage so it allows deltas to be properly used rather than the full operations.

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