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KDE and GNOME: KUnity, Presentations, GitLab and Flatpaks

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KDE
GNOME
  • A year as a KDE developer | The KUnity Setup

    It has been more than a year that I had push rights for all the KDE repositories. So this is an obligatory anniversary post.

    I got introduced to Linux while searching for development environments that came with all sorts of compilers & interpreters by default and I don't have to manually install those stuff. It was 2012 as far as I remember, Ubuntu 12.04 just came out and it was the first solution suggested by the search engines. Though the unavailability of a proper internet connection meant, that I had to wait a couple more years when one of my friends downloaded a copy of Ubuntu 14.04 for me.

  • FOSDEM and Plasma Mobile Sprint 2020

    This was the 20th anniversary for FOSDEM, I first attended 15 years ago, but this year was the first time I actually managed to present a talk there. The subject was, unsurprisingly, KDE Itinerary. You can find the slides and the video recording on the corresponding FOSDEM talk page.

    KDE had a very busy presence at FOSDEM, Plasma Mobile draw a lot of attention, as did efforts for truly free and user-controlled mobile platforms in general. I’m particularly happy seeing the cross-community collaborations going on in that space.

    FOSDEM is a great place to connect and coordinate with other communities, and by now that’s probably one of the main reasons for me to attend. The collaboration with Nextcloud on integrating itinerary extraction into Nextcloud Hub started there last year for example.

    FOSDEM two years ago saw the first successful flight using a KDE Itinerary rendered boarding pass, this year we had the first ever Thalys ride with a ticket presented in KDE Itinerary. We also made a bit of progress with decoding Thalys binary barcodes, more samples would help a lot here though.

  • Presentations Archive

    Some time ago I ran across remark-cmake, a CMake framework for building remark.js-based presentations. Since I’m a sucker for CMake I started using it, even if my presentations are rarely big-and-complicated enough to warrant a build-system.

    Since then I’ve submitted a few pull-requests to remark-cmake, but also given eight (8) presentations using that framework at four (4) different conferences in four countries on two continents. Current scheduling suggests that one more continent and at least four more talks will be added before summer.

  • Clean and linear history with GitLab

    Many GNOME projects still use clean and linear commit history without merge commits even after porting to GitLab. That means that each commit represents one comprehensive feature or bug fix and there are not any side branches. I am not about to discuss the pros and cons of this approach here, you can find many and many posts on this topic on the internet. I would like to explain some common issues for newcomers when using GitLab forks.

    To make some contribution, one has to create a fork of some repository, push desired changes in a new branch and create a merge request to the original project. Please be sure that the “Allows commits from members who can merge to the target branch” checkbox is checked when creating the merge request (or later using the “Edit” button on the top of the page). This is needed to simplify the consequent workflow for the contributor (and maintainers as well). One of the reasons, why this is needed is the fact, that the changes need to be often rebased before they can be merged (to ensure the linear history). Maintainers can’t do this when this feature is not enabled and have to ask contributors to do so. Another reason is that the maintainers can do some changes when the contributor needs help or doesn’t have time to do the changes itself.

  • Robocode and others

    As expressed in a previous post, I prefer to spend my free time with my kids than with technology (for technology I already have my job). However, when there is an exception to that, I do like to do some sort of smaller projects, like “porting” stuff to Flatpak.

    I did my share of Debian and RPM packaging in the past, and honestly I have never enjoyed it (for a number of reasons not really interesting for this post). But “flatpaking” stuff is completely different to me. Maybe it’s my early involvement with it, or maybe it’s my admiration for how its designed, but the feeling when making a Flatpak is of reward, rather than a chore.

WebKitGTK 2.28 Seeing Flatpak Sandbox Support, WebGL + WebAudio

  • WebKitGTK 2.28 Seeing Flatpak Sandbox Support, WebGL + WebAudio By Default

    Following this weekend's GNOME 3.36 beta, WebKitGTK 2.27.90 is available as a snapshot of this GTK-catered version of the WebKit layout engine on its path towards version 2.28.

    With WebKitGTK 2.27.90 there are many new features baking for WebKitGTK 2.28: Flatpak sandboxing support, WebGL and WebAudio are finally enabled by default in WebKitSettings, support for same-site cookies, support for the webkit-font-smoothing CSS property, support for inspecting service workers to the remote inspector, and various other changes.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Kernel: Rust, Language, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Linus Torvalds' Initial Comment On Rust Code Prospects Within The Linux Kernel

    Kernel developers appear to be eager to debate the merits of potentially allowing Rust code within the Linux kernel. Linus Torvalds himself has made some initial remarks on the topic ahead of the Linux Plumbers 2020 conference where the matter will be discussed at length. In the mailing list thread when discussing Greg Kroah-Hartman's past comments on the Rust prospects for the kernel, it was mentioned that one of the conditions being sought is that it would effectively be disabled by default until there has been sufficient testing.

  • Linux 5.8 Formally Adds The Inclusive Terminology Guidelines

    Merged overnight into the Linux kernel source tree are the new guidelines concerning the use of "inclusive terminology" for future code. It was just one week ago that the inclusive terminology guidelines for the Linux kernel were first proposed to mixed reaction and have now been merged into the source tree after receiving enough approval of various upstream kernel maintainers. [...] There are around 19.5k mentions of "slave" within the kernel source tree, mostly within the kernel networking code. The string "master" is mentioned some 26.9k times. For "blacklist" are around 888 mentions when checking in the current Git tree. Linux is currently at around 69.3k text files with around 3.54 million lines of code comments and 20.1 million lines of code (along with 3.6 million blank lines).

  • Linux team approves new terminology, bans terms like 'blacklist' and 'slave'

    Linus Torvalds approved on Friday a new and more inclusive terminology for the Linux kernel code and documentation. Going forward, Linux developers have been asked to use new terms for the master/slave and blacklist/whitelist terminologies.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Systems Boot and Security Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Systems Boot and Security Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference! Computer-system security is an important topic to many. Maintaining data security and system integrity is crucial for businesses and individuals. Computer security is paramount even at system boot up, as firmware attacks can compromise the system before the operating system starts. In order to keep the integrity of the system intact, both the firmware as well as the rest of the system must be vigilant in monitoring and preventing malware intrusion. As a result of last year’s microconference Oracle sent out patches to support Trenchboot in the Linux kernel and in GRUB2. An agreement was also reached on problems with TPM 2.0 Linux sysfs interface.

  • GNU Tools Track Added to Linux Plumbers Conference 2020

    We are pleased to announce that we have added an additional track to LPC 2020: the GNU Tools track. The track will run for the 5 days of the conference.

Programming: GNOME/GTK, GNU C Library, Perl and Python

  • Implementing Gtk based Container-Widget: Part — 2

    This write-up is in continuation of its previous part — setting up basic container functionality. In the past couple of weeks, we moved on from just adding children to actually repositioning them (child widgets of the container, NewWidget) when enough space is not available for all widget to fit in the given width. Though the grid structure is yet to put in place, the widget could be seen taking shape already (look at below gif).

  • This week in GNOME Builder #2

    This week we fixed some specific topics which were planned for the previous cycle. If anyone wants to contribute so see some of our “Builder wishlist” go there: Builder/ThreePointThirtyfive Last time i had forgotten to mention the great work of our translation team which contributed various translations to Builder. Thank you!

  • Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS CPUs Now Supported By GNU C Library

    The Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS is designed for high performance embedded environments with the 32-bit HS5x and 64-bit HS6x series. Synopsys has long offered their own GNU toolchain builds to support the DesignWare ARC hardware on Linux while now the mainline support is in good shape with glibc for the ARCv2 ISA having been mainlined. Though do note it's ARCv2 and not the latest ARCv3 ISA.

  • A FIXIT-dive into an old CPAN module

    Let’s have a thought experiment. Assume there is an Open Source-licensed Perl module published on CPAN that you care about, and that hasn’t had any updates in a very long time - what are your options? In this blog post, I’ll take a dive into this problem, and use the Geo::Postcodes::NO module as an example. As of this writing, the module version is 0.31, and it’s most recent release was in September 2006. [...] Contribution information for the module is missing (or at least, less than expected). The author ARNE has offered his email address, and after a quick search one can find his Github page. He hasn’t published this module there, though. If we are going to contribute with this, then just adding a CONTRIBUTING.md file is a probably a good place to start. If the module you are looking for has the same problem, then check out it’s “How to contribute” page on MetaCPAN (you can find a link to it in the menu there). There’s another issue though – we can’t offer a pull-request! At best we can send a patch(1) file attached to an email. While this is a bit old-school and should still work (assuming the author accepts those), there might be better options available.

  • Chapter 3 - Google Correlate example update

    In Chapter 3 on Page 87, the book refers to the Google Correlate service. However, as of December 2019, the service has been shutdown. Since the chapter requires you to download a CSV formatted data, it is no longer possible. However, you can instead download a version of the data that I had used 5 years back when writing the book from here.

  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 004 - Class Attributes and Inheritance

    Learnt about Class Attributes and Inheritance, today.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxv) stackoverflow python report

May/June in KDE PIM

Following Dan here’s the summary of what happened around KDE PIM in the last two months. While the focus was mainly on the 20.04.x maintenance releases and KDE’s source code hosting and review systems migrated to a Gitlab instance during that time, development continued at full steam with more than 1,800 changes by 34 contributors. Read more More KDE: 20.08 releases branches created