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The Southern California Linux Exposition 2007

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Linux

The Southern California Linux Exposition's fifth year has been its best yet, with record attendance, vendor participation, and excellent presentations and talks. There were few new things to announce or showcase at the event, but if you wanted to measure the pulse of the open source software community, this was undeniably the place to be this past weekend.

More of an event, less of a show

SCALE 5x was held in the Westin LAX hotel in Los Angeles over three days. The first comprised two mini-conferences on open source software in health care and women in the open source software community. There were far fewer attendees than one might find at a LinuxWorld Conference and Exposition, but SCALE is not so much a "show" with fancy displays and contests and such; it's really more of a community event with industry sponsorship. There were few flashy presentations, even the big vendors had small booth spaces, and both the community projects and the commercial vendors shared the same area of the floor.

The exhibitors

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