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This week in KDE: Plasma 5.18 is nigh

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KDE
Software

The release of Plasma 5.18 is upon us! In 10 more days, it will be yours to have and to hold. Until then, the Plasma developers have been working feverishly to fix bugs–and land some welcome improvements in 5.19!

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Also from KDE: Elisa has been submitted to the Windows Store

More by Michael Larabel and Albert Astals Cid

  • KDE Begins February With More Improvements In Tow

    While KDE Plasma 5.18 is dropping soon, feature work is already underway on Plasma 5.19 and other areas of the KDE desktop stack.

  • QCA cleanup spree

    What I probably also did is maybe break the OSX and Windows builds, so if you're using QCA there you should start testing it and propose Merge Requests.

    Note: My original idea was to actually kill QCA because i started looking at it and lot of the code looked a bit fishy, and no one wants crypto fishy code, but then i realized we use it in too many places in KDE and i'd rather have "fishy crypto code" in one place than in lots of different places, at least this way it's easier to eventually fix it.

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