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How a Corrupted USB Drive Was Saved by GNU/Linux

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Linux

My friend's brother had a 512MB Lexar Media Jumpdrive Pro USB drive that became corrupted after using it with Windows 2000. His IT department was able to get back some but not all of the file contents, but without any file names. On his own, he tried some recovery utilities, but all failed. Using a typical Linux distro--in this case SuSE 8.0--however, it wasn't hard to recover almost all of the data from the drive along with the filenames and to burn a CD-ROM of the contents.

The big questions was "can Linux read the drive?" A Web search of "linux usb jumpdrive pro" gave me hope that my kernel, 2.4.18 on SuSE 8.0, would recognize the drive in question. So, as root, I typed:

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