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Lars Kurth RIP

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  • Lars Kurth RIP

    Ian Jackson posted a note to the xen-announce mailing list with the sad news that Xen community manager and project advisory board member Lars Kurth has died.

  • Lars Kurth
    I'm very sad to inform you that Lars Kurth passed away earlier this
    week.  Many of us regarded Lars as a personal friend, and his loss is a
    great loss to the Xen Project.
    
    We plan to have a tribute to Lars on the XenProject blog in the near
    future.  Those who are attending FOSDEM may wish to attend the short
    tribute we plan for Sunday morning:
      https://fosdem.org/2020/schedule/event/vai_memory_of_lars_kurth/
    
    For the moment, Lars's mail aliases @xenproject.org, and the
    community.manager@xenproject alias, will be forwarded to myself
    and/or George Dunlap.
    
    Ian Jackson.
    

Saying Goodbye to Lars Kurth: Open Source Advocate and Friend

  • Saying Goodbye to Lars Kurth: Open Source Advocate and Friend

    Lars joined the Xen Project in January 2011, and it’s no exaggeration to say that the project may not be here without him. He worked to formalize the project’s governance documents, making it clear how companies could contribute and affect the decisions of the project. He spearheaded the search for a “home” for Xen.org within a larger governing body and oversaw its movement into the Linux Foundation.

    He developed the concept of Xen Project sub-projects, and oversaw the addition of Xapi, Windows Drivers, Mirage, Unikraft, Automotive, and finally XCP-ng as sub-projects. He was instrumental in forging relationships with various companies, finding out what their business goals were, and helping them see how they could work with the Xen Project to achieve them. Lars, gifted at communicating across boundaries, was a tireless peace-keeper. He always listened and strived for mutual understanding.

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