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Mesa 19.3.3

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • [Mesa-dev] [ANNOUNCE] mesa 19.3.3
    Hi list,
    
    I'd like to announce mesa 19.3.3. This release was delayed due to bugs caught in
    CI that needed to be resolved before the release could be made. Due to the
    slightly longer cycle there's slightly more patches than would normally be
    present in the release.
    
    I've also started using a new script to find the patches in master to pick, so
    please ignore any .pick_status.json: commits, they're generated by the new
    script.
    
    There's plenty of changes here, but intel, docs, radeonsi, and aco are the
    biggest sets of changes.
    
    Dylan
    
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Adam Jackson (1):
          drisw: Cache the depth of the X drawable
    
    Andrii Simiklit (1):
          mesa/st: fix a memory leak in get_version
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (2):
          radv: Disable VK_EXT_sample_locations on GFX10.
          radv: Remove syncobj_handle variable in header.
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (1):
          intel/fs: Only use SLM fence in compute shaders
    
    Daniel Schürmann (2):
          aco: fix unconditional demote_to_helper
          aco: rework lower_to_cssa()
    
    Dylan Baker (5):
          docs: add SHA256 sums for 19.3.2
          cherry-ignore: Update for 19.3.3
          .pick_status.json: Update to c787b8d2a16d5e2950f209b1fcbec6e6c0388845
          docs: Add relnotes for 19.3.3 release
          VERSION: bump version to 19.3.3
    
    Eric Anholt (1):
          mesa: Fix detection of invalidating both depth and stencil.
    
    Eric Engestrom (1):
          meson: use github URL for wraps instead of completely unreliable wrapdb
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (8):
          docs: fix typo in html tag name
          docs: fix paragraphs
          docs: open paragraph before closing it
          docs: use code-tag instead of pre-tag
          docs: use code-tags instead of pre-tags
          docs: use code-tags instead of pre-tags
          docs: move paragraph closing tag
          docs: remove double-closed definition-list
    
    Francisco Jerez (3):
          glsl: Fix software 64-bit integer to 32-bit float conversions.
          intel/fs/gen11+: Handle ROR/ROL in lower_simd_width().
          intel/fs/gen8+: Fix r127 dst/src overlap RA workaround for EOT message payload.
    
    Hyunjun Ko (1):
          turnip: fix invalid VK_ERROR_OUT_OF_POOL_MEMORY
    
    Jan Vesely (1):
          clover: Initialize Asm Parsers
    
    Jason Ekstrand (8):
          anv: Flag descriptors dirty when gl_NumWorkgroups is used
          intel/vec4: Support scoped_memory_barrier
          intel/blorp: Fill out all the dwords of MI_ATOMIC
          anv: Don't over-advertise descriptor indexing features
          anv: Memset array properties
          anv/blorp: Rename buffer image stride parameters
          anv: Canonicalize buffer formats for image/buffer copies
          anv: Stop allocating WSI event fences off the instance
    
    Jonathan Marek (1):
          st/mesa: don't lower YUV when driver supports it natively
    
    Kenneth Graunke (2):
          intel/compiler: Fix illegal mutation in get_nir_image_intrinsic_image
          intel: Fix aux map alignments on 32-bit builds.
    
    Lasse Lopperi (1):
          freedreno/drm: Fix memory leak in softpin implementation
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (4):
          anv: fix intel perf queries availability writes
          anv: only use VkSamplerCreateInfo::compareOp if enabled
          intel/perf: expose timestamp begin for mdapi
          intel/perf: report query split for mdapi
    
    Marek Olšák (4):
          ac/gpu_info: always use distributed tessellation on gfx10
          radeonsi: work around an LLVM crash when using llvm.amdgcn.icmp.i64.i1
          radeonsi: clean up how internal compute dispatches are handled
          radeonsi: don't invoke decompression inside internal launch_grid
    
    Nataraj Deshpande (1):
          egl/android: Restrict minimum triple buffering for android color_buffers
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (8):
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_retile_dcc
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_compute_expand_fmask
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_compute_clear_render_target
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_compute_copy_image
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_compute_do_clear_or_copy
          radeonsi: fix fmask expand compute shader
          radeonsi: make sure fmask expand is done if needed
          util: call bind_sampler_states before setting sampler_views
    
    Rhys Perry (8):
          aco: set vm for pos0 exports on GFX10
          aco: fix imageSize()/textureSize() with large buffers on GFX8
          aco: fix uninitialized data in the binary
          aco: set exec_potentially_empty for demotes
          aco: disable add combining for ds_swizzle_b32
          aco: don't DCE atomics with return values
          aco: check if multiplication/clamp is live when applying output modifier
          aco: fix off-by-one error when initializing sgpr_live_in
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (2):
          radv: only use VkSamplerCreateInfo::compareOp if enabled
          radv: fix double free corruption in radv_alloc_memory()
    
    Samuel Thibault (1):
          meson: Do not require libdrm for DRI2 on hurd
    
    Tapani Pälli (1):
          egl/android: fix buffer_count for applications setting max count
    
    Thong Thai (1):
          mesa: Prevent _MaxLevel from being less than zero
    
    Timur Kristóf (1):
          aco/gfx10: Fix VcmpxExecWARHazard mitigation.
    
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-19.3.3
    
  • Mesa 19.3.3 Released With Many Fixes

    While Mesa 20.0 will be entering its feature freeze this week and branching ahead of the stable release expected in about one month, for now the Mesa 19.3 series is the newest available for stable users.

    Among the fixes to find with Mesa 19.3.3 are listed below while mostly amounting to the usual AMD Radeon and Intel churn along with other core work.

  • Mesa 19.3.3 Released with Improvements for Dead Rising 4, Many Fixes

    The Mesa 3D graphics library has been updated today to version 19.3.3, another bugfix release in the Mesa 19.3 series that addresses various crashes and other issues.

    Mesa 19.3.3 arrives two weeks after version 19.3.2 and it’s here to fix a crash with the Dead Rising 4 action-adventure video game on GFX6 and GFX7 family of AMD GPUs, improve compiling support with GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 10, and a memory leak in the softpin implementation of the Freedreno DRM driver.

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