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Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Memory Usage – Week 14

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Linux

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers.

There are 3 models of the RPI4 available. They are identical except for the amount of RAM onboard; choose from 1GB of RAM, 2 GB of RAM, or 4GB of RAM. There’s no way of upgrading the RAM once a user has made their purchase. So it’s pretty important to choose the model that best fits your requirements, or you may end up spending more than necessary, or even need to buy extra RPI4’s.

For this week’s blog, I’m seeking to provide information that’ll help you determine which model of the RPI4 to get. This article will be periodically updated with more information.

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