Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Rebuttal of Mandriva Linux 2007.1 "Spring" Beta 1

Filed under
MDV

After Ladsilav vigurously slammed Fedora 7 Test 1 for not having any release notes (and I quote: "there are really no excuses ... this fiasco raises serious questions"), it's time for Béranger to refute the just released Mandriva Linux 2007.1 "Spring" Beta 1.

I downloaded both the KDE and the GNOME One CDs, somehow codenamed "doctor" (the DVD seems to be "loolapop" (yes, I have already asked myself about these extra names of the betas).

Let's give a quick try to the KDE LiveCD.

To my big surprise, no fancy boot menu. I just pressed ENTER and it started to boot. An even bigger surprise was to see that I wasn't pompted with a graphical login.

Let's try the GNOME CD now.

This time, the Spring "doctor" tried to raise gdm, but it couldn't, so "XKeepsCrashing" brought me a nice ncurses message:

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Rackspace developer advocate on getting started with open source

There are several reasons. If you have an idea for a utility or framework or whatever, and you would like the support of an entire community of developers, open source is a great way to go. If you want your code "out there" so it can be reviewed and critiqued (which will improve your skills), open source is a good solution. If you are just out of school and want to establish yourself and show off your coding skills, start an open source project. Finally, if you're altruistic and just want to help the software community at large, yes, please, start an open source project. Read more

Ubuntu Snappy Core Runs on Banana Pi BPI-M2 with Linux Kernel 4.1.6, Download Now

After reporting last week news about the Ubuntu MATE 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) operating system running on the Banana Pi BPI-M1 SBC (Single-board computer) device, we're informing you today that Snappy Ubuntu Core runs on Banana Pi BPI-M2. Read more

Linux 4.3

Using Linux Mint: Common tasks, features and to-dos for the first-timer

Linux-based operating systems are like those friends you make in high school--you know the type: reserved, quirky and not quite like the rest of the pack. But intelligent and the kind that, once you get to know them, will stand by you through thick and thin. Ok, that may be a stretch, but you get the idea. Linux comprises but a fraction of a percent of operating systems deployed, and with reason--it’s traditionally been difficult to set up and use. Which is why it used to appeal only to users with a higher level of computer proficiency: basically geeks. But while this was the case back in the day, plenty has changed--today installing and using it is very comparable to the Windows experience. Read more