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Qt 5.14.1 Released

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Development
KDE

I am happy to announce we have released Qt 5.14.1 today. As a patch release, Qt 5.14.1 does not add any new functionality but provides many bug fixes and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.14.0, the new Qt 5.14.1 contains around 220 bug fixes including security issue fixes for both Qt (CVE-2020-0570) and 3rd party components (CVE-2019-19244, CVE-2019-19603, CVE-2019-19242, CVE-2019-19645, CVE-2019-19646 & CVE-2019-19880). Also in QtWebEngine there are many CVE fixes from Chromium. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.14.1.

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Also: Qt 5.14.1 Released With 200+ Bug Fixes, Including Security Fixes

Qt LTS Releases To Be Restricted To Commercial Customers

  • Qt LTS Releases To Be Restricted To Commercial Customers, Other Commercial Changes

    Moving forward, Qt Long-Term Support (LTS) releases will be restricted to commercial customers. All bug fixes will go into the public Qt development tree but the back-porting of fixes to Qt LTS branches will be restricted now to commercial customers. The Qt Company is hoping this move will make more companies become commercial customers in order to gain LTS access.

    Additionally, The Qt Company will now require Qt Accounts for downloading binary packages. This helps The Qt Company in tracking users and they say to "simplify distribution and integration with the [Qt] Marketplace." Thankfully most Linux users get Qt via their distribution package management systems.

  • [Development] Changes to Qt offering
    Hi all,
    
    The Qt Company has done some adjustments to the Qt will be offered in the future. Please check out https://www.qt.io/blog/qt-offering-changes-2020 . 
    
    The change consists of three parts. 
    
    One is a change in policy regarding the LTS releases, where the LTS part of a release is in the future going to be restricted to commercial customers. All bug fixes will (as agreed on the Qt Contributor Summit) go into dev first. Backporting bug fixes is something that the Qt Company will take care of for these LTS branches. We’ve seen over the past that LTS support is something mainly required by large companies, and should hopefully help us get some more commercial support for developing Qt further.
    
    The second change is that a Qt Account will be in the future required for binary packages. Source code will continue to be available as currently. This will simplify distribution and integration with the Marketplace. In addition, we want open source users to contribute to Qt or the Qt ecosystem. Doing so is only possible with a valid Qt Account (Jira, code review and the forums all require a Qt Account).
    
    The third change is that The Qt Company will in the future also offer a lower priced product for small businesses. That small business product is btw not limited to mobile like the one Digia had some years ago, but covers all of Qt for Device Creation.
    
    None of these changes should affect how Qt is being developed. There won’t be any changes to Open Governance or the open development model.
    
    Best regards,
    Lars
    

The Qt Company is stopping Qt LTS releases.

  • The Qt Company is stopping Qt LTS releases. We (KDE) are going to be fine

    Obvious disclaimer, this is my opinion, not KDE's, not my employer's, not my parents', only mine Wink

    Big news today is that Qt Long-term-supported (LTS) releases and the offline installer will become available to commercial licensees only.

    Ignoring upcoming switch to Qt6 scenario for now, how bad is that for us?

    Let's look at some numbers from our friends at repology.

    At this point we have 2 Qt LTS going on, Qt 5.9 (5.9.9 since December) and Qt 5.12 (5.12.6 since November).

    How many distros ship Qt 5.9.9? 0. (there's macports and slackbuilds but none of those seem to provide Plasma packages, so I'm ignoring them)

    How many distros ship Qt 5.12.6? 5, Adélie Linux, Fedora 30, Mageia 7, OpenSuse Leap 15.2, PCLinux OS (ALT Linux and GNU Guix also do but they don't seem to ship Plasma). Those are some bigger names (I'd say specially Fedora and OpenSuse).

Qt offering changes 2020

  • Qt offering changes 2020

    Much is happening around Qt these days: We have just opened the Qt Marketplace, released a new MCU offering as well as Qt 5.14, and the Design Studio is developing rapidly.

    [...]

    Since the Qt Account was introduced, the amount of registered Qt accounts has been growing steadily up to almost one million, today.

    From February onward, everyone, including open-source Qt users, will require valid Qt accounts to download Qt binary packages. We changed this because we think that a Qt account lets you make the best use of our services and contribute to Qt as an open-source user.

    We want open-source users to help improve Qt in one form or another, be that through bug reports, forums, code reviews, or similar. These are currently only accessible from a Qt account, which is why having one will become mandatory.

  • Qt offering changes 2020

    The Qt blog has announced some changes in how the Qt toolkit is offered to consumers. Notably, installation of Qt binaries will require a Qt Account and long-term-supported (LTS) releases and the offline installer will become available to commercial licensees only.

About “Qt offering changes 2020”

  • About “Qt offering changes 2020”

    When I read “Qt offering changes 2020” yesterday, my first reaction was to write a pissy blog post. I’m still writing a blog post with my thoughts about the changes, but I’ll be nice. There are three parts to this post: a short recap of my history with Qt and then my thoughts on what this means for KDE, for Krita and for free software.

    I started programming using Qt and PyQt when I read about Qt in Linux Journal, which I was subscribing to back in 1996. That means that I’ve been using Qt for about 25 years. I initially wanted to write an application for handling linguistic field data, and I evaluated GTK+, wxWidgets, Qt, Tk, fltk, V and a few others that have been forgotten in the mists of time. I choose Qt because it had great documentation, a consistent API, the most logical (to me…) way of doing things like setting up a window with a menu or handling scrollbars and finally because it made C++ as easy as Java.

Qt is relocatable

  • Qt is relocatable

    As of version 5.14.0 Qt is relocatable, i.e. it is possible to move the Qt installation to a different directory without breaking functionality or loading of plugins.

    Let’s slip into the role of the Qt build master of a Windows project. You’re the one who knows all configure arguments by heart. You know which optimization screw to turn and which unneeded feature to turn off.
    Your Qt build is perfectly tailored to the project and you’re providing a zip file containing the Qt installation.

Qt 5.15 Feature Development Is Over For This Last Step

  • Qt 5.15 Feature Development Is Over For This Last Step Of The Qt5 Series

    Just as scheduled, earlier this month the feature freeze went into effect for Qt 5.15 as the last major step for Qt5 before seeing Qt 6.0 hopefully arrive towards the end of the year.

    The Qt 5.15 Alpha release is expected to come in the days ahead but was delayed due to the late merging of new HorizontalHeaderView and VerticalHeaderView controls for tables in Qt Quick, which landed today. Still to happen on the Qt 5.15 branch before the beta is also more deprecations of functionality working to be removed or changed with Qt6.

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