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GhostBSD 20.01 Now Available

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BSD

I am happy to announce the availability of GhostBSD 20.01 with some improvements made to the installer, mainly improvements to the way the installer UI deals with custom partitions involving GTP and UEFI. Also, some system and software has been updated

GhostBSD 20.01 ISO has some minor improvements over 19.10. It provides an up to date ISO with the latest packages and system updates for new installation with a simple installation process to get you going quickly. For current installation, no need to reinstall.

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Also: GhostBSD 20.01 Released For FreeBSD 12.1 + MATE 1.22.2 Desktop Experience

GhostBSD 20.01 overview | A simple, elegant desktop BSD OS

GhostBSD 20.01 released, here’s how to upgrade

  • GhostBSD 20.01 released, here’s how to upgrade

    The GhostBSD Team announced the release of GhostBSD 20.01. In the official release announcement, GhostBSD Project founder Eric Turgeon said, “I am happy to announce the availability of GhostBSD 20.01 with some improvements made to the installer, mainly improvements to the way the installer UI deals with custom partitions involving GTP and UEFI.” The first iteration of GhostBSD, 1.0, was first released in the FOSS community in March 2010, based on FreeBSD, with the project goal to combine security, privacy, stability, usability, openness, freedom, and to be free.

How to install GhostBSD 20.01

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