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Graphics: Wayland 1.18 Alpha, Linux on Embedded Ryzen with Radeon, and Keith Packard's X Talk

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • wayland 1.17.91
    This is the alpha release for Wayland 1.18. Here's a highlight of the
    biggest changes:
    
    - Add support for the Meson build system (autotools is still supported
      but will be removed in a future release)
    - Add API to tag proxy objects to allow applications and toolkits to
      share the same Wayland connection
    - Track wayland-server timers in user-space to prevent creating too
      many FDs
    - Add wl_global_remove, a new function to mitigate race conditions with
      globals
    
    Thanks to all contributors!
    
    Full commit history below.
    
    Antonio Borneo (1):
          log: remove "%m" from format strings by using strerror(errno)
    
    Daniel Stone (2):
          build/doc: Ensure destination dir exists despite VPATH
          display-test: Remove unused variables
    
    Drew DeVault (3):
          Document unusual wl_registry.bind new_id behavior
          Add .editorconfig
          Improve description of wl_surface
    
    Emmanuel Gil Peyrot (2):
          cursor: Use memfd_create() when available
          wayland-shm: Don’t set SIGBUS handlers on unshrinkable fd
    
    Emmanuele Bassi (2):
          Support running tests from different build directories
          Add Meson build
    
    Harish Krupo (2):
          docs: Abort configure if docbook-xsl package is missing
          wayland.xml: document invalid_finish error in wl_data_offer.finish
    
    Jiayuan Ren (1):
          adding O_RDWR flag in the open()
    
    Jonas Ådahl (1):
          proxy: Add API to tag proxy objects
    
    Joshua Watt (2):
          scanner: Add configure check for strndup
          Move wl_priv_signal to wayland-server-private.h
    
    Leonid Bobrov (1):
          configure: detect libdl and librt
    
    Liu Wenlong (1):
          server: Fix fake "Address already in use" error
    
    Manuel Stoeckl (13):
          scanner: error when element names will not compile
          tests: Verify that wayland_scanner can catch bad identifiers
          protocol: clarify wl_display.delete_id description
          connection: do not abort when dup(fd) fails
          client: Ignore new requests if display has a fatal error
          client: Don't abort when sending a request fails
          tests: Test that send overflow doesn't abort
          tests: Fix race condition in send overflow test
          tests: Ensure that overflow test always overflows
          event-loop-test: Verify proper timer cancellation
          event-loop-test: Confirm distant timers do not fire
          event-loop: Track timer event sources in userspace
          event-loop-test: Add test to verify timer ordering
    
    Marty E. Plummer (1):
          scanner: prepend protocol name to types symbol
    
    Michael Forney (3):
          Use wl_container_of internally
          Avoid pointer arithmetic on `void *`
          protocol: fix typo in wl_data_offer.set_actions description
    
    Mosè Giordano (1):
          Add $(RT_LIBS) to fixed-benchmark LD dependencies
    
    Pekka Paalanen (2):
          configure.ac: reopen master for regular development
          scanner: include config.h from command line
    
    Scott Anderson (1):
          wayland.xml: Make releases for multiple 'wl_surface.attach' undefined
    
    Simon Ser (22):
          Add releasing.txt
          releasing: adapt for Wayland
          releasing: fixup section numbers
          protocol: allow to send a zero output refresh rate
          client: check event opcode in queue_event
          Update .editorconfig for Python
          Add an automated script to update wl_shm.format
          protocol: add a comment about the wl_shm.format script
          protocol: sync wl_shm.format with libdrm 2.4.99
          server: check global interface on bind
          tests: test that binding to a global with an interface mismatch fails
          protocol: invalid_method is sent on malformed request
          server: add wl_global_set_user_data
          server: add wl_global_remove
          tests: add a test for wl_global_remove
          build: check wayland-scanner version
          Revert "build: check wayland-scanner version"
          meson: use strict wayland-scanner mode
          autotools: use strict wayland-scanner mode
          build: check wayland-scanner version
          protocol: add missing enums for wl_data_device_manager.dnd_action
          build: bump to version 1.17.91 for the alpha release
    
    asynts (1):
          doc: Expand the abbreviation "hw" to "hardware".
    
    orbea (1):
          Add a missing -pthread to fix compile with slibtool.
    
    git tag: 1.17.91
    
  • Wayland 1.18 Alpha Released With Meson Support, Connection Sharing

    Wayland 1.18 is adding Meson build system support so that Autotools can be dropped in a future release, API support for allowing applications and toolkits to share the same Wayland connection, better handling over file descriptors, and wl_global_remove as a new function for mitigating race conditions with globals. There are also various test improvements, improved documentation, and various other fixes and minor improvements.

  • Linux on Embedded Ryzen with Radeon

    American Micro Devices (AMD) has released the Ryzen processors which works very well with Linux. The embedded processor also contains a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) which is an AMD Ryzen Vega.

    The board I am using is the IBase 918f-1605 to install Linux. Linux can be installed from a stock ISO, but the system does not perform as well unless using a special Linux kernel from AMD. It also helps to have the proper GPU driver for performance. Stability is much better with the AMD kernel they provide on their website.

  • Keith Packard Talks About The Early Politics Of X Window System + Code Licensing

    At last week's Linux.Conf.Au conference was an interesting presentation by longtime X developer Keith Packard on the early days of the pre-X.Org X Window System, the collapse of Unix, and how his views formed on copyleft licenses for building thriving communities.

    Keith's LCA 2020 presentation is focused on the X happenings largely during the 80's and very early 90's. Keith's involvement goes back to the 80's during which he was employed at MIT as part of the X Consortium.

  • Keith Packard: lca2020

    I just got back from linux.conf.au 2020 on Saturday and am still adjusting to being home again. I had the opportunity to give three presentations during the conference and wanted to provide links to the slides and videos.

Vulkan 1.2.132 Released As The First Documentation Fix-Up

  • Vulkan 1.2.132 Released As The First Documentation Fix-Up Following Vulkan 1.2

    Following last week's release of Vulkan 1.2, Vulkan 1.2.132 was released on Tuesday as the first maintenance/point release to this major Vulkan API revision.

    With Vulkan 1.2.132 there are no new extensions but a number of corrections to the documentation/specification as a result of a number of public and private bug reports. This includes clarifications as well for ensuring the correct semantics of Vulkan API behavior.

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