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Wine 5.0 Released

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  • Wine 5.0 Released

    The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 5.0 is now available.

    This release represents a year of development effort and over 7,400 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements that are listed in the release notes below. The main highlights are:

    - Builtin modules in PE format.
    - Multi-monitor support.
    - XAudio2 reimplementation.
    - Vulkan 1.1 support.

    This release is dedicated to the memory of Józef Kucia, who passed away in August 2019 at the young age of 30. Józef was a major contributor to Wine's Direct3D implementation, and the lead developer of the vkd3d project. His skills and his kindness are sorely missed by all of us.

  • Wine release 5.0
    What's new in Wine 5.0
    ======================
    
    
    *** PE modules
    
    - Most modules are built in PE format (Portable Executable, the
      Windows binary format) instead of ELF when the MinGW compiler is
      available. This helps various copy protection schemes that check
      that the on-disk and in-memory contents of system modules are
      identical.
    
    - The actual PE binaries are copied into the Wine prefix instead of
      the fake DLL files. This makes the prefix look more like a real
      Windows installation, at the cost of some extra disk space.
    
    - Modules that have been converted to PE can use standard wide-char C
      functions, as well as wide-char character constants like L"abc".
      This makes the code easier to read.
    
    - Not all modules have been converted to PE yet; this is an ongoing
      process that will continue during the Wine 5.x development series.
    
    - The Wine C runtime is updated to support linking to MinGW-compiled
      binaries; it is used by default instead of the MinGW runtime when
      building DLLs.
    
    
    *** Graphics
    
    - Multiple display adapters and monitors are properly supported,
      including dynamic configuration changes.
    
    - The Vulkan driver supports up to version 1.1.126 of the Vulkan spec.
    
    - The WindowsCodecs library is able to convert more bitmap formats,
      including palette-indexed formats.
    
    
    *** Direct3D
    
    - Fullscreen Direct3D applications inhibit the screensaver.
    
    - DXGI swapchain presents inform the application when the
      corresponding window is minimized. This typically allows
      applications to reduce CPU usage while minimized, and is in some
      cases required to allow the application window to be restored again.
    
    - Switching between fullscreen and windowed modes using the standard
      Alt+Enter combination is implemented for DXGI applications.
    
    - The following features are implemented for Direct3D 12 applications:
      - Switching between fullscreen and windowed.
      - Changing display modes.
      - Scaled presents.
      - Swap intervals.
      These features were previously already implemented for earlier
      versions of the Direct3D API.
    
    - The handling of various edge cases is improved. Among others:
      - Out of range reference values for the alpha and stencil tests.
      - Sampling 2D resources with 3D samplers and vice versa.
      - Drawing with mapped textures and buffers.
      - Usage of invalid DirectDraw clipper objects.
      - Creating Direct3D devices on invalid Windows, like the desktop
        window.
      - Viewports with a minimum Z larger than or equal to the maximum Z.
      - Resources bound through both shader-resource views and
        render-target or depth-stencil views at the same time.
      - Blits between formats with and without alpha components.
      Since well-behaved applications don't rely on these edge cases, they
      typically only affect one or two applications each. There are
      nevertheless quite a number of them.
    
    - Dirty texture regions are tracked more accurately for Direct3D 8 and 9
      texture uploads.
    
    - Uploads of S3TC-compressed 3D textures require less address space.
      Since 3D textures can be potentially large, and address space
      exhaustion is a concern for 32-bit applications, S3TC-compressed 3D
      textures are uploaded per-slice, instead of in a single upload.
    
    - The ID3D11Multithread interface is implemented.
    
    - Various lighting calculation fixes and improvements for older
      DirectDraw applications have been made.
    
    - Limited support for blits across swapchains is implemented.
    
    - More shader reflection APIs are implemented.
    
    - The wined3d CPU blitter can handle compressed source resources.
      Support for compressed destination resources was already implemented
      in a previous release.
    
  • Wine 5.0 Released With Big Improvements For Gaming, Countless Application Fixes

    Wine 5.0 has been released as stable as the annual timed release of this software for running Windows games and applications on Linux, macOS, and other platforms.

    Wine 5.0 is another big step forward in allowing modern Windows applications to run well particularly on Linux and macOS. Thanks to CodeWeavers and funding by Valve for their work on the Wine-based Proton downstream, there are many game fixes that have been incorporated over the past year especially. So Windows games are in better shape plus there is Vulkan 1.1 support, FAudio integration, and countless other improvements.

  • The bottle for Wine 5.0 has officially been popped open as it's out now

    The day has arrived, the official stable release of Wine 5.0 has arrived bringing thousands of improvements and a bunch of new features.

    [...]

    Wine 5.0 as a release is also being dedicated to the memory of Józef Kucia, a major contributor to Wine's Direct3D implementation and he lead developer of the vkd3d project who sadly passed away in August 2019.

Wine 5.0 Released With Numerous Gaming Improvements for Linux

  • Wine 5.0 Released With Numerous Gaming Improvements for Linux

    Wine 5.0 has been released today and contains over 7,400 bug fixes and numerous audio and graphics improvements that will increase performance in gaming on Linux.

    Wine is a compatibility layer that allows you to run Windows applications, including games, in Linux and macOS. This means that users can run native Windows games and applications such as Steam, Battlefield 1942, Fallout: New Vegas, Counter-Strike, and much more directly in Linux.

Windows compatibility layer Wine hits v5.0 on Android

  • Windows compatibility layer Wine hits v5.0 on Android

    Wine has been giving users of Unix-like platforms access to Windows software for many, many years. The open source project just added support for Android back in 2018 with the v3.0 update and continued that with Wine v4.0 last year. Now, Wine v5.0 is available on multiple platforms including Android.

    This version of Wine includes some nice functionality improvements. You can run multiple monitors in Wine, and there's support for the new-ish Vulkan 1.1 graphics API. The Wine app doesn't contain Windows or any Windows software, but it does let you load Windows applications on your device.

Wine 5.0 Officially Released

  • Wine 5.0 Officially Released with Multi-Monitor and Vulkan 1.1 Support, More

    Big news today for Linux gamers and ex-Windows users as the final release of the Wine 5.0 software is now officially available for download with numerous new features and improvements.

    After being in development for more than one year, Wine 5.0 is finally here with a lot of enhancements, starting with support for multi-monitor configurations, the reimplementation of the XAudio2 low-level audio API, Vulkan 1.1.126 support, as well as built-in modules in PE (Portable Executable) format.

    "This release is dedicated to the memory of Józef Kucia, who passed away in August 2019 at the young age of 30. Józef was a major contributor to Wine's Direct3D implementation, and the lead developer of the vkd3d project. His skills and his kindness are sorely missed by all of us," reads today's announcement.

LWN coverage

  • Wine 5.0 released

    Wine 5.0 has been released. The main highlights are builtin modules in PE format, multi-monitor support, XAudio2 reimplementation, and Vulkan 1.1 support.

Coverage by Logix

  • Wine 5.0 Stable Released With Vulkan 1.1 Support, Reimplemented XAudio2, Proper Multi-Monitor Support

    Wine 5.0 is available for download after being in development for a year. This release includes over 7400 changes, the main highlights being proper multi-monitor support, Vulkan 1.1 support, the reimplementation of XAudio2, and built-in modules in the PE format.

    [...]

    As usual, most of these changes / features were already available in the Wine staging and development builds maintained by WineHQ, which are also used by Lutris, PlayOnLinux or Valve's Proton for example.

    [...]

    The Wine 5.0 binaries provided by WineHQ have not yet been built at the time I'm writing this article, but they should be available very soon. That's why in the screenshot above I'm using Wine 5.0-rc6 (development build). The source is already available for download though.

    It's worth noting that Wine 5.0 (this started with Wine 4.5 development / staging) is the first stable Wine release that requires the libfaudio0 dependency, which is not available in the Ubuntu 19.04 / Debian 10.1 / Linux Mint 19.* and older repositories, or in the official Wine repository.

Wine 5.0 for Linux released with major gaming improvements

  • Wine 5.0 for Linux released with major gaming improvements

    Today, the Wine Project officially released Wine 5.0 as stable for the Linux, macOS, Android (limited support), and FreeBSD platforms. The announcement comes after a year of development by the Wine team comprising bi-weekly development releases.

    For those unfamiliar with Wine (Wine is Not an Emulator), it is a FOSS compatibility layer that allows users to run computer programs like computer games and application software on Linux platforms, and more recently, macOS platforms, too. Wine was first released in 1993, over 26 years ago.

Wine 5.0 released (Windows compatibility layer for Linux, Mac...

  • Wine 5.0 released (Windows compatibility layer for Linux, Mac, Android, and BSD)

    The Wine project has been letting folks run some Windows applications on Unix-like operating systems including Linux, macOS, and FreeBSD for decades… and a few years ago, the developers of this open source project added limited support for Android as well.

    Wine 5.0 is now available for all supported platforms, and it brings a number of improvements including support for the Vulkan 1.1 graphics driver and support for multiple monitors.

Wine 5.0 is Released! Here’s How to Install it

  • Wine 5.0 is Released! Here’s How to Install it

    With some efforts, you can run Windows applications on Linux using Wine. Wine is a tool that you may try when you must use a software that is available only on Windows. It supports a number of such software.

    A new major release for Wine has landed i.e Wine 5.0, almost after a year of its 4.0 release.

    Wine 5.0 release introduces a couple of major features and a lot of significant changes/improvements. In this article, I’ll highlight what’s new and also mention the installation instructions.

  • Wine Is Approaching Six Million Lines Of Code

    Given yesterday's release of Wine 5.0 I was curious to run some development stats on Wine Git as of the 5.0 release tag for seeing how development is trending on this wildly popular program among Linux users especially for running Windows games and applications.

    When running GitStats on the Wine Git repository, it's now up to 135,558 commits from around 1,586 different authors with the oldest Wine code dating back to its initial release in 1993.

Wine 5.0 has been released

  • Wine 5.0 has been released

    Linux users rejoice; the team behind the Wine application has released Wine 5.0 for all supported operating systems. Wine 5.0 is as usual available as a binary for certain systems, e.g. Android, Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and Mac Os, and as source code.

    Wine 4.0, the last major version release, was released one year ago in January 2019. Wine, in a nutshell, lets Linux and Mac users run many Windows applications on their devices. It is great for users who switched to Linux or Mac OS X but want or need access to certain programs.

    Games play a core part probably. Valve uses a modified version of Wine on Steam to provide Linux gamers with access to Windows game.

Wine 5.0 Released by WineHQ- Stable available for Download

  • Wine 5.0 Released by WineHQ- Stable available for Download

    Wine 5.0 Stable Release: WineHQ, the developer of Wine released its latest and most stable Wine 5.0 on January 21, 2020. The latest version comes with a lot of surprising updates and features which makes Wine 5.0 stand out of its previous releases. Wine 5.0 release has been dedicated to Mr. Józef Kucia, the major contributor to Wine’s Direct3D implementation who passed away recently at a young age. May his soul rest in peace.

Wine for running Windows 10 apps on Linux gets big upgrade

  • Wine for running Windows 10 apps on Linux gets big upgrade

    Wine, the software that Microsoft has partially credited with making Windows 10 Windows Subsystem for Linux possible, has been updated with over 7,400 changes.

    Wine is a compatibility layer, designed for Unix-like OSes, which enables Linux and macOS systems to run Windows applications.

Wine 5.0 Released: Improved Support For Windows Games And Apps

  • Wine 5.0 Released: Improved Support For Windows Games And Apps

    Wine is a reliable savior that makes it possible to run many Windows applications on GNU/Linux, macOS, and Ubuntu at native speed without slowing down the system. Now, its stable version Wine 5.0 has been released.

    After a year of effort, with over 7,400 individual changes, Wine 5.0 arrives with major improvements such as Direct3D and XAudio2 reimplementation, and Vulkan 1.1 and Multi-monitor support.

Wine, the Windows Compatibility Layer, reaches version 5.0

  • Wine, the Windows Compatibility Layer, reaches version 5.0 on Android

    The Android app ecosystem has steadily evolved over the years of Android’s existence, fuelled by the steady adoption of mobile as the primary computer interaction for most people. A lot of users have gravitated towards a mobile-only lifestyle, and that is because the apps and the app ecosystem on mobile have managed to fulfill their particular needs. But if you ever find yourself in need of a desktop application without having access to a desktop, what would you do? This is where Wine comes, a Windows Compatibility Layer that allows users to run full-blown Windows applications on different OSs. Wine for Android has now reached v5.0, collating a year’s worth of development efforts from the team.

Two more articles about Wine

  • Wine 5.0 now available for all supported operating systems

    When it comes to running Windows software on Linux-based operating systems, Wine is one of the best choices lying around — and most likely the most popular one. Yesterday, the Wine team announced the arrival of the stable release labeled 5.0.

    According to the official news release, this new piece of code comes as the result of a year of development and includes no less than 7,400 individual changes.

  • Wine 5.0 released with a wealth of new features and improvements

    The development team behind Wine the free and open-source compatibility layer, created to enable Microsoft Windows applications and software to run on Unix-like operating systems, has this week announced the availability of Wine 5.0. This release represents a year of development effort and over 7,400 individual changes together with a large number of improvements.

    Main features included in Wine 5.0 take the form of Builtin modules in PE format, Multi-monitor support, XAudio2 re-implementation and Vulkan 1.1 support. A contents list of what is new within the latest Wine 5.0 application as listed below. For a complete list jump over to the official Wine HQ website by following the link below.

How to install Wine 5.0

Linux could win over more PC gamers from Windows thanks to Wine

  • Linux could win over more PC gamers from Windows thanks to Wine 5.0

    Wine, an application that lets folks run Windows software and games on Linux (or other operating systems like macOS) has just hit another big milestone, reaching version 5.0 and introducing a number of important changes, particularly on the gaming front.

    In total, no less than 7,400 changes have been made to Wine 5.0 since the release of the previous version (4.0) a year ago.

How to Install Wine 5.0 Stable in Ubuntu

Updated Wine version improves Windows 10 Linux compatibility

How to install Wine 5.0 on Ubuntu 19.10

Wine 5.0 Is Now Available With New Features

  • Wine 5.0 Is Now Available With New Features

    The latest version of Wine is now available for download. Wine 5.0 is now available with new features. If you don’t know what actually wine is then Wine (originally an acronym for “Wine Is Not an Emulator”) is a compatibility layer capable of running Windows applications on operating systems, such as Linux, macOS, & BSD.

WineD3D Vulkan Back-End Is Back In The Works

  • WineD3D Vulkan Back-End Is Back In The Works Following Wine 5.0

    One of the features that didn't materialize in time for Wine 5.0 as the annual stable Wine release was the work-in-progress Vulkan back-end to WineD3D. Rather than going from Direct3D to OpenGL as WineD3D currently does, there has been efforts to introduce a Vulkan back-end similar to the likes of DXVK.

    The WineD3D Vulkan back-end just began forming in 2019 via CodeWeavers developers. This is at the same time the Wine developers have been working on VKD3D as their solution for Direct3D 12 over Vulkan albeit developed outside of the Wine code-base.

How to install Wine 5.0 on Debian 10 Buster

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