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Software: broot, VokoscreenNG, Kubic with Kubernetes

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  • broot Is An Interactive Treeview Directory Navigation Tool For The Command Line

    broot is an interactive command line tool written in Rust for navigating directories using a tree view and fuzzy search. It also incorporates a ncdu like disk usage mode.

    The tool is inspired by the tree command (which is not interactively searchable though, and doesn't act as a launcher) and the excellent fzf command line fuzzy finder, allowing users to navigate to a directory and locate a particular file with the minimum amount of keystrokes.

    It runs on Linux, macOS and Windows. There are some rough edges on Windows though - some things need fixing, and it's quite slow on Windows for now. It works great and it's very fast on Linux though (and I assume macOS, although I don't own a Mac so I didn't try it).

  • VokoscreenNG – Vokoscreen Screencaster Rewritten From Scratch

    VokoscreenNG, open-source screen recording software formerly called Vokoscreen, released its first stable version days ago.

    Vokoscreen 2.5 is the last version with ffmpeg and will not more continue developed. The new VokoscreenNG, which is based of Qt and GStreamer, has been rewritten from scratch with new modern UI. And it works on Linux and Windows.

    VokoscreenNG so far does not provide any binary packages, though Linux binary Appimage and Flatpak package were requested. At the moment, you can build the software from the source.

  • Kubic with Kubernetes 1.17.0 released

    The Kubic Project is proud to announce that Snapshot 20200113 has just been released containing Kubernetes 1.17.0.

    This is a particually exciting release with Cloud Provider Labels becoming a GA-status feature, and Volume Snapshotting now reaching Beta-status.

More in Tux Machines

Not-actually Linux distro review: FreeBSD 12.1-RELEASE

Desktop layer aside, the entire FreeBSD operating system doesn't seem to get as much developer love and attention as the typical mainstream Linux distribution. It doesn't take much use before you discover minor errors and paper cuts that really shouldn't exist—like pkg search not returning metapackages, or the disk partitioner not accepting its own example arguments as valid. My personal biggest frustration with FreeBSD—and the major reason I switched from it to Linux in 2008—is the lack of automatic security upgrades. FreeBSD does have tools to discover vulnerabilities in packages and update them, but they aren't designed to run in the background. They demand either interactive operation by an active and knowledgeable admin or significant tooling that the FreeBSD operating system itself does not provide. Worse yet, FreeBSD has at least two and often three entirely separate package systems to maintain. The source-based ports tree, the binary package system, and the base FreeBSD operating system itself—each uses entirely different tools for maintenance. If that's not bad enough, ports and packages actually conflict with one another, requiring even more care to make sure neither gets clobbered during upgrades. Digital Ocean has an excellent overview of basic FreeBSD maintenance, which we would strongly advise any new FreeBSD admin to read and understand thoroughly. Read more

Android Leftovers

How to set up a remote school environment for kids with Linux

COVID-19 has suddenly thrown all of us into a new and challenging situation. Many of us are now working full-time from home, and for a lot of us (especially people who aren't used to working remotely), this is taking some getting used to. Another group that is similarly challenged is our kids. They can't go to school or participate in their regular after-school activities. My daughter's elementary school closed its classrooms and is teaching through an online, web-based learning portal instead. And one of her favorite extracurricular activities—a coding school where she has been learning Scratch and just recently "graduated" to WoofJS–has also gone to an online-only format. We are fortunate that so many of our children's activities can be done online now, as this is the only way they will be able to learn, share, and socialize for at least the next several months. Read more

LOOPFS File-System Proposed For Linux

LOOPFS is the latest Linux kernel file-system proposal. LOOPFS isn't a traditional Linux file-system for competing with the likes of EXT4, F2FS, Btrfs, and XFS but is a loop device file-system inspired by Android's BinderFS. Read more Also: Loopfs: A New Loop Device File System For Linux Direct: [PATCH 0/8] loopfs