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GNU Guile 3.0.0 released

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GNU

We are ecstatic and relieved to announce the release of GNU Guile 3.0.0. This is the first release in the new stable 3.0 release series.

See the release announcement for full details and a download link.

The principal new feature in Guile 3.0 is just-in-time (JIT) native code generation. This speeds up the performance of all programs. Compared to 2.2, microbenchmark performance is around twice as good on the whole, though some individual benchmarks are up to 32 times as fast.

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Also:

  • GNU Guile 3.0 Released With JIT Code Generation For Up To 4x Better Performance

    GNU Guile 3.0 has been released, the GNU's implementation of the Scheme programming language with various extra features. The big news with Guile 3.0 is better performance.

    GNU Guile 3.0 adds just-in-time (JIT) code generation yielding up to four times faster performance. JIT code generation for Guile is enabled automatically and transparently. Guile 3.0 moves its virtual machine instruction set to be lower-level now to allow for more optimizations and has a variety of other improvements.

  • GNU Guile 3.0.0 released
    We are delighted to announce GNU Guile release 3.0.0, the first in the
    new 3.0 stable release series.
    
    Compared to the previous stable series (2.2.x), Guile 3.0 adds support
    for just-in-time native code generation, speeding up all Guile programs.
    See the NEWS extract at the end of the mail for full details.
    
    
    The Guile web page is located at http://gnu.org/software/guile/, and
    among other things, it contains a copy of the Guile manual and pointers
    to more resources.
    
    Guile is an implementation of the Scheme programming language, packaged
    for use in a wide variety of environments.  In addition to implementing
    the R5RS, R6RS, and R7RS Scheme standards, Guile includes full access to
    POSIX system calls, networking support, multiple threads, dynamic
    linking, a foreign function call interface, powerful string processing,
    and HTTP client and server implementations.
    
    Guile can run interactively, as a script interpreter, and as a Scheme
    compiler to VM bytecode.  It is also packaged as a library so that
    applications can easily incorporate a complete Scheme interpreter/VM.
    An application can use Guile as an extension language, a clean and
    powerful configuration language, or as multi-purpose "glue" to connect
    primitives provided by the application.  It is easy to call Scheme code
    from C code and vice versa.  Applications can add new functions, data
    types, control structures, and even syntax to Guile, to create a
    domain-specific language tailored to the task at hand.
    

GNU Guile 3.0.0 released

  • GNU Guile 3.0.0 released

    Version 3.0.0 of the Guile implementation of the Scheme programming language has been released. There's a lot of work here, including a new, lower-level byte code implementation, interleaved internal definitions, a new exception implementation, and much more. "Guile programs now run up to 4 times faster, relative to Guile 2.2, thanks to just-in-time (JIT) native code generation. Notably, this brings the performance of "eval" as written in Scheme back to the level of 'eval' written in C, as in the days of Guile 1.8."

GNU Guile 3.0.0 now available

  • GNU Guile 3.0.0 now available

    GNU Guile, a programming and extension language for the GNU Project, is now available as version 3.0.0. According to the team, this is the first release in the stable 3.0 release series.

    The major new feature in this version is just-in-time (JIT) native code generation, which helps speed up performance. In this release, microbenchmark performance is twice as good as the 2.2 release, and some individual benchmarks have seen improvements up to 32 times as fast, according to the project maintainers.

    Other new features include support for interleaved definitions and expressions in lexical contexts, native support for structured exceptions, and improved support for R6RS and R7RS Scheme standards.

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