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Games: DXVK, Cortex Command, Aeolis Tournament, Imperator: Rome, Vagrus, DOOM Eternal and Valve's 'Gamescope'

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Gaming
  • Linux's Gaming Future | DXVK Enters Maintenance mode

    In this video, I go over recent news about DXVK entering maintenance mode and what their lead developer is doing and how this affects Linux's gaming future.

  • Cortex Command has a Community Project that aims to keep the game alive

    Remember Cortex Command? Data Realms released a Linux build for the Humble Indie Bundle 2 in 2010, sadly the Linux version never really progressed much but since it was opened sourced last year it can live on and it is alive.

    The Cortex Command Community Project (GitHub) is one such attempt to revive it, updating it to keep it working nicely on modern systems. I spoke with the maintainer who said they've worked to deal with any case sensitivity in the engine (because Windows is not case sensitive, but Linux is) and replacing the sound library FMOD, with Gorilla Audio. Their main goal of this, is to give it feature parity with the Windows version which they said it does.

  • 3D party action game 'Aeolis Tournament' is on Kickstarter promising some chaotic fun on Linux

    Beyond Fun Studio are raising a little funding on Kickstarter to complete their crazy party game, Aeolis Tournament, which is planned to release with Linux support this Spring.

    You compete in various different game modes, using a super-easy one-button mechanic. Each character has an air cannon, to affect their surroundings for whatever mode they're in. Inspired by the likes of Fuzion Frenzy, they're going for a "Nintendo-inspired" cartoony look.

  • Paradox to focus on smaller and more frequent updates to Imperator: Rome this year

    Paradox Development Studio have given their first 2020 update on the roadmap for the struggling Imperator: Rome.

    Unlike their other titles including Stellaris, Crusader Kings and Europa Universalis they're switching up their release schedule to push out what they said will be "smaller, more frequent updates" in comparison. This means the 1.4 update which was going to be titled "Cassander" won't be happening as planned.

    It makes sense, this is one of their worst launches and it's still not doing well so rather than building everything into big expansions making people wait long periods they're going to try and turn it around a little quicker.

  • Apocalyptic fantasy RPG strategy 'Vagrus - The Riven Realms' new build out, passed $50K on Fig

    Before talking a little about the new build, let's look at some numbers. Lost Pilgrims Studio put Vagrus up on Fig in May last year, so in around eight months they've managed to pass well over $50K on Fig so it certainly seems like they're doing well. Using Fig's "Open Access" funding model, a hybrid that blends Early Access and Crowdfunding. They have a set milestone in funding for certain features, a ton of which have been hit now.

    [...]

    It's really turning into an exceptional narrative-driven experience, the style and writing are fantastic and really do pull you into the world. What's interesting is that I often struggle with RPG experiences that make me sit still and read (I prefer a good narrator and voice over), but Vagrus is just so captivating I end up absorbed by it. If you enjoy a good read with trading, combat and exploration then Vagrus - The Riven Realms should tick a few boxes for you. The Linux version works great, really enjoying it.

  • DOOM Eternal coming to Stadia on March 20, plus other Stadia news - a round-up

    First up we have a delay, with Marvel's Avengers that was due to release in May being pushed back until September. According to Crystal Dynamics, they said this is to "spend this additional development time focusing on fine tuning and polishing the game to the high standards our fans expect and deserve"—fair enough. It's expected to release on Stadia at the same time as other platforms.

    [...]

    Something also interesting is that Anna Kipnis, a Senior Prototyper & Game Designer at Google (who is also on the Stadia Star Labs research team), will be doing a talk at GDC 2020 in March titled "Machine Learning Summit: Creating Game AI by Using Mostly English, with Semantic ML". This is a feature Google are hoping to pull into Stadia, to have more interesting/smarter AI.

  • Valve continue working behind the scenes for Linux gaming with 'Gamescope'

    Valve are definitely up to something. For a little while, Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais has been tweaking steamcompmgr, the SteamOS session compositing window manager.

    After being quiet on SteamOS development for a long time with no update since July last year, it certainly seems now like some parts of it are being revived either for the next major SteamOS release or Valve's other Linux gaming projects. Work on steamcompmgr seemed to stall back in 2018, with it suddenly seeing activity on GitHub in October last year.

More in Tux Machines

The Future of the Arch Linux Project Leader

Some of you may know me from the days when I was much more involved in Arch, but most of you probably just know me as a name on the website. I’ve been with Arch for some time, taking the leadership of this beast over from Judd back in 2007. But, as these things often go, my involvement has slid down to minimal levels over time. It’s high time that changes. Arch Linux needs involved leadership to make hard decisions and direct the project where it needs to go. And I am not in a position to do this. Read more

today's leftovers (GNU/Linux, Open Access and Openwashing)

  • Why Huawei Without Google Is Not The End, But The Start Of Something New [Ed: Huawei already puts GNU/Linux on some major products]

    Last year, Huawei strapped in for a rough ride when US President Donald Trump called for a trade ban on the Chinese tech giant. Huawei was placed on the US’ Entity List since May 2019, stopping them from doing business with American companies unless granted approval by the US Government. The move essentially cut Huawei off from their US supply of parts, such as the latest chips by Intel and Qualcomm — but the greatest impact felt was definitely losing access to Google’s licensed software, apps and services. The one question boggling fans and users was what would happen when future Huawei phones come without Google’s Android and Google Mobile Services (GMS) like Gmail, Google Chrome and Google Maps?

  • 27th Time The Charm? Intel SGX Enclaves Support For Linux Revved Again

    For four years we have been seeing Intel Secure Guard Extensions (SGX) bring-up for the Linux kernel and that work continues with the Intel SGX Enclaves support now having been sent out for review twenty-seven times as it tries to work its way towards the mainline Linux kernel.

  • X.Org Server Lands Fixes For XWayland Full-Screen Support
  • Ksnip is a cross-platform, open source screenshot tool with many annotation options

    The program supports five modes for capturing screenshots. Rectangular Area is the default one which was mentioned in the above paragraph. The second option is Last Rectangular Area, selecting this option directly captures the content inside the previous area that you chose. This is a rather unusual option, and quite a useful one as it allows you to retake a screenshot or take another one in case something changed inside the rectangle. The Full Screen mode can be used to save a snapshot of the entire screen. What's special here is that, Ksnip can capture the screen from all connected monitors. So, you can use it to take wide screenshots from videos, games and maybe even set the captured image as your desktop background wallpaper.

  • Open Source textbooks saving Beaufort County Community College students money
  • Open-source textbooks save Beaufort students over $50,000 per semester

    Open source textbooks are helping students at Beaufort County Community College save money, making the cost of their education less expensive and helping stretch financial aid or scholarship money they may be receiving. The average student will spend over $1,200 on textbooks per year. Since initial adoption by Ashleigh Howard, Lead Professor for the Social & Behavioral Sciences Department, the books have been adopted by other professors across campus, cumulatively saving students over $50,000 per semester. Currently, cultural geography, history, criminal justice, sociology and Spanish classes are using the books.

  • UBank puts open source accessibility kit on GitHub [Ed: This feeds a proprietary software trap of Microsoft for openwashing purposes and to make matters worse, it is not accessible]
  • Precious Plastic open source recycling project takes a new perspective toward waste

    “Plastic is a precious and valuable material. It’s just been kind of designed, used and marketed in the wrong way, in our view,” explained Precious Plastic business guy (yes, that’s his real title) Joseph Klatt. The company’s business guy is originally from Ohio but moved to the Netherlands where the project is headquartered.

  • The open source platform empowering creatives to turn recycling into craft [Ed: This use of the term "open source" may be misleading]

    In response to this, Hakkens looked to the large-scale recycling plants that operate across the world. Their huge industrial machines then formed the base of the Precious Plastic operation. “He began recreating these machines on a small scale, putting the blueprints and assembly instructions online for others to use,” continues Elleke. Once built, users can create with the waste plastic however they need, making anything from furniture and household goods, to bricks and other modular structures. The possibilities, she says, are endless: “Anything made with plastic, can be made with recycled plastic.” According to Elleke, the whole idea was to “take a global problem, and find a community solution.” In giving a second, third or infinite number of lives to waste plastic, Hakkens and his team provide local designers, craftspeople and creatives with a new material and profit stream.

OSS Leftovers

  • Dell EMC Streaming Data Platform integrates open source technology

    Dell combines several open source streaming data technologies, including Apache Kafka, Apache Flink and Pravega, to create a new streaming data platform.

  • Instaclustr Achieves PCI-DSS Certification for its Managed Apache Cassandra and Kafka Offerings on AWS
  • Democratizing space exploration with new technologies

    Democratization means nothing without the support of and collaboration with public consumers and talent. Open source software, whose source code anyone can peruse, modify and contribute to, allows NewSpace industries to engage directly with the public through hands-on, widely accessible opportunities that help develop and improve technology. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a big proponent of these open access projects, finding that they build online and in-real-life communities and help shape the future of NewSpace tech. These open access resources solicit submissions from all over the world, inviting users to send their personal research concept to space. Participants, for example, can rent time on a cubesat constellation (similar to buying time on a cloud computing system). Here they can interact in open science communities with access to libraries and maker studios where users can utilize MIT’s already vast research portfolio. On top of it all, the initiative offers other integrated support systems like a STEAM outreach program with educational resources, curriculum and DIY hacker guidelines for climate-smart cubesats.

  • Should I Use Open Source Instead Of Demand Planning Software For Forecasting?

    You’re not going to get advanced modeling like machine learning in Excel. Excel can’t handle large data sets either, making it clunky and problematic.

  • Collaboration Over Competition: How Companies Benefit from Open Innovation

    More and more technology companies are adopting open innovation initiatives. This is largely due to the realization of the benefits of working with outside experts to gain external perspectives and insights. This situation wherein an organization thinks beyond its internal resources for innovation and collaborates with external resources is known as open innovation. Open innovation is an opportunity for the company to utilize those external ideas and use them to develop innovative products and services. It may seem simple, but there is more to the collaboration process than just brainstorming.

  • An Open Source Ebike

    In the ebike world, there are two paths. The first is a homemade kit bike with motors and controllers from China. The second is a prebuilt bike from a manufacturer like Giant, with motors and controllers from China, which will be half as fast and cost three times as much. The choice is obvious, and there are other benefits to taking the first path as well, such as using this equipment which now has an open source firmware option. [...] This new open source firmware for the TSDZ2 further improves on the ride by improving the motor responsiveness, improving battery efficiency, and opening up the ability to use any of a number of color displays. (More information is available on a separate Wiki.)

  • RedNotebook 2.17

    RedNotebook is a modern desktop journal. It lets you format, tag and search your entries. You can also add pictures, links and customizable templates, spell check your notes, and export to plain text, HTML, Latex or PDF. RedNotebook is Free Software under the GPL.

  • Monitoring Your Network with Time Series: How Open Source Can Help

    Network monitoring is critical to all IoT Operations and for security and Time Series can be a secret cheat code to keeping that network all shipshape. Learn how, in an upcoming webinar from InfluxData.

  • Open in Browser is a Firefox extension that opens PDFs, images directly instead of downloading them

    I installed the add-on and tried accessing the same URLs. A new prompt appeared and Open in Browser detected them as "server sent MIME". It had an option to open it with Firefox. This saves you the trouble of downloading and opening it. Another advantage is that your downloads folder doesn't get cluttered.

Programming Leftovers

  • What developers need to know about domain-specific languages

    A domain-specific language (DSL) is a language meant for use in the context of a particular domain. A domain could be a business context (e.g., banking, insurance, etc.) or an application context (e.g., a web application, database, etc.) In contrast, a general-purpose language (GPL) can be used for a wide range of business problems and applications. A DSL does not attempt to please all. Instead, it is created for a limited sphere of applicability and use, but it's powerful enough to represent and address the problems and solutions in that sphere. A good example of a DSL is HTML. It is a language for the web application domain. It can't be used for, say, number crunching, but it is clear how widely used HTML is on the web. A GPL creator does not know where the language might be used or the problems the user intends to solve with it. So, a GPL is created with generic constructs that potentially are usable for any problem, solution, business, or need. Java is a GPL, as it's used on desktops and mobile devices, embedded in the web across banking, finance, insurance, manufacturing, etc., and more.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Rev 1.2 Fixes USB-C Power Issues, Improves SD Card Resilience

    The first Raspberry Pi 4 boards suffered from a poor USB-C power supply compatibility due to issues for the power circuitry. That means if you bought the official USB-C power supply you had no issues, but if you wanted to re-use a spare USB-C power supply or incompatible cable, you may be out of luck.

  • OpenVPN setup

    For historical reasons, I run a bunch of IT infrastructure at home. Mindful of sayings like the cloud is just other people's computers I’ve installed jails on my home FreeBSD NAS / server / router to deliver a bunch of services. Mail, for instance, and an LDAP server to experiment with, and something for package building.

  • Using C and C++ for data science

    While languages like Python and R are increasingly popular for data science, C and C++ can be a strong choice for efficient and effective data science. In this article, we will use C99 and C++11 to write a program that uses the Anscombe’s quartet dataset, which I'll explain about next. I wrote about my motivation for continually learning languages in an article covering Python and GNU Octave, which is worth reviewing. All of the programs are meant to be run on the command line, not with a graphical user interface (GUI). The full examples are available in the polyglot_fit repository.

  • PyDev of the Week: Hameer Abbasi

    This week we welcome Hameer Abbasi as our PyDev of the Week! Hameer works on the PyData Sparse project. [...] I was doing a Hilfswissenschaftler job (sort of like a Research Assistant in the USA), and there I was presented the problem of scaling a sparse system to a larger space. I discovered the PyData/Sparse project back then (it was in Matthew Rocklin’s personal repository at the time), and was immediately fascinated by the idea of computational gains to be had if one moved to a sparse representation. I’m now the maintainer for that project, and I’m grateful I chose that path, as it landed me a talk at SciPy 2018 and a client in the form of Quansight.