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Devices: Gaël Duval (Eelo or /e/), Wind River Claims "Linux Leadership", More on "Reachy" From Pollen Robotics

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  • Gaël Duval: A video interview at CoderStories

    I forgot to publish this quite comprehensive video interview I had with Sylvain Zimmer at CoderStories!

  • Wind River Extends Embedded Security and Linux Leadership with Acquisition of Star Lab

    Wind River®, a leader in delivering software for the intelligent edge, today announced its acquisition of Star Lab, a leader in cybersecurity for embedded systems. The acquisition broadens the comprehensive Wind River software portfolio with a system protection and anti-tamper toolset for Linux, an open source–based hypervisor, and a secure boot solution. Star Lab is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Wind River. Terms of the acquisition were not disclosed.

    Historically, embedded devices have functioned in isolation, deployed to environments minimally connected to the outside world. However, with the emergence of ubiquitous connectivity paradigms such as IoT and remotely monitored/autonomously controlled industrial and transportation systems, today’s cyber threat landscape is rapidly evolving. Central to this evolution is the ease with which a focused and resourced adversary can acquire and reverse engineer deployed embedded systems. In addition to modification or subversion of a single specific device, hands-on physical access also aids an attacker in discovery of remotely-triggerable software vulnerabilities.

  • Meet Reachy, an expressive, open-source humanoid system

    This is Reachy, a very expressive and open-source robot developed by the French company Pollen Robotics. The robot was presented during CES this year.

    Obviously, among the pros of the robot, the fact that it is based on an open-source platform capable of learning more and more. At the moment, the robot has already shown its ability with simple games, but developers can use Python to create countless applications for the system. The modular nature of the robot allows an unlimited number of applications: use within the restaurant, customer service, demonstrations is possible, and it can also be dedicated to research and development sectors.

    [...]

    Reachy’s arms have 7 degrees of freedom of movement and can be equipped with various manipulators to simulate a five-fingered hand grip. It can manipulate up to 500-gram object.

Wind River acquires Star Lab to improve its Linux security

  • Wind River acquires Star Lab to improve its Linux security

    Once upon a time Wind River was best known as a leading embedded operating system (VxWorks) and Linux (Wind River Linux) company. It still is. But things have changed. Now its customers want their devices to work in the world of the Internet of Things (IoT) and that requires much better security. That's one reason why Wind River just acquired the Linux security company Star Lab.

    Star Lab brings its Titanium Security Suite to Wind River's table. It uses a threat model that assumes an attacker will gain root (admin) access to your system, but makes it harder for them to do your system any harm. It also offers a secure virtual machine (VM) hypervisor, Crucible. Star also has a secure boot program, which ensures that a device's firmware and boot code hasn't been maliciously modified or manipulated.

Wind River Acquires Star Lab

A couple more reports

  • Wind River buys Star Lab for better system-wide security

    Jim Douglas, the CEO of Wind River is a big believer in Linux. This may seem like an odd stance coming from the head of a company built for the embedded world where real-time operating systems (RTOS) reign, but for the last decade or more Wind River has been expanding its portfolio of products to include Linux operating systems. In 2012, it built its own Linux based OS on the Yocto Linux kernel. Wind River wants to bring the world of IT to the old-school industrial world.

  • Wind River acquires Star Lab

    Wind River has announced the acquisition of Star Lab, a leader in cybersecurity for embedded systems.

    The acquisition broadens Wind River's software portfolio with a system protection and anti-tamper toolset for Linux, a secure open source-based hypervisor, and a secure boot solution. Star Lab is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Wind River.

    With the emergence of the connectivity associated with IoT and remotely monitored/autonomously controlled industrial and transportation systems, today's cyber threat landscape is evolving. Central to this is the ease with which a focused and resourced adversary can acquire and reverse engineer deployed embedded systems.

    Specialising in cyber and anti-tamper security software for Linux, Star Lab provides embedded security for mission-critical systems, infrastructure, and equipment. Its solutions look to address security challenges across critical infrastructure, including proactive protection of systems, even during sophisticated and targeted attacks that breach traditional defensive mechanisms.

Wind River acquires Star Lab to broaden portfolio with cyber...

  • Wind River acquires Star Lab to broaden portfolio with cyber and anti-tamper security software for Linux

    Wind River, a leader in delivering software for the intelligent edge, announced its acquisition of Star Lab, a leader in cybersecurity for embedded systems.

    The acquisition broadens the comprehensive Wind River software portfolio with a system protection and anti-tamper toolset for Linux, a secure open source–based hypervisor, and a secure boot solution. Star Lab is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Wind River. Terms of the acquisition were not disclosed.

    Historically, embedded devices have functioned in isolation, deployed to environments minimally connected to the outside world. However, with the emergence of ubiquitous connectivity paradigms such as IoT and remotely monitored/autonomously controlled industrial and transportation systems, today’s cyber threat landscape is rapidly evolving.

Wind River Extends Embedded Security and Linux Portfolio

  • Wind River Extends Embedded Security and Linux Portfolio with Acquisition of Star Lab

    Wind River announced its acquisition of Star Lab, a player in cybersecurity for embedded systems. The acquisition broadens the comprehensive Wind River software portfolio with a system protection and anti-tamper toolset for Linux, an open source–based hypervisor, and a secure boot solution. Star Lab is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Wind River. Terms of the acquisition were not disclosed.

    Specializing in cyber and anti-tamper security software for Linux, Star Lab provides embedded security for some of the most mission-critical systems, infrastructure, and equipment in the world. While born and bred in aerospace and defense, its solutions can help tackle the hardest security challenges across critical infrastructure, including proactive protection of systems, even during sophisticated and targeted attacks that breach traditional defensive mechanisms. Star Lab advances the Wind River strategy for delivering security across the system, from boot to deployment and operations.

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