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Openwashing Leftovers

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OSS
  • Actiontec Expands Its Role at prpl Foundation With Commitment to Enable Support for the Wi-Fi Alliance’s Data Elements Specification

    Actiontec Electronics announced that it is expanding its role at the prpl Foundation with a commitment to contribute code to support the Wi-Fi Alliance’s Data Elements Release 1 specification. Actiontec is already a member of the prpl Foundation, an open-source collaborative foundation that enables high-velocity, service-driven innovation on customer-premises equipment.

    Actiontec’s contribution will enable carriers deploying the prpl Foundation’s solution on their gateways to monitor in-home Wi-Fi performance, helping to ensure the best Wi-Fi experience for each subscriber. The WiFi Alliance’s Data Elements Specification defines a standard set of Wi-Fi parameters, making it easier for service providers to gather data across CPE devices from different vendors. Support for Wi-Fi Data Elements is a requirement for Wi-Fi CERTIFIED EasyMesh™ R2 certification.

  • Uber Open-sources Manifold Visual Debugging Tool for Machine Learning Researchers

    Manifold helps scientists and engineers identify performance issues through slices and models of ML data, and diagnose their real causes by surfacing variations in the distribution of features across data subsets.

    Uber recently announced that it is has released Manifold as an open source project. Manifold is a model-agnostic machine learning visual debugging tool that the company utilizes to identify issues in ML models. To provide the advantages of this tool to other ML practitioners. Manifold was first introduced in January 2019.

  • Lyft open-sources Flyte tool for managing machine learning workflows

    Ride-sharing company Lyft Inc. today said it has open-sourced a new debugging tool for artificial intelligence data that its pricing, locations, estimate time of arrivals, mapping and self-driving developer teams have been using in-house for the last three years.

    Flyte is described by Lyft as a “structured and distributed platform for concurrent, scalable and maintainable machine learning workflows.”

  • TIER IV Alliance with LG on Advanced Cloud Simulator Technology Expected to Accelerate Safe Deployment of Autonomous Vehicles

    Tier IV, a world leader in the open-source software development for self-driving technology known as Autoware, has entered into a strategic alliance with global innovator LG Electronics related to advanced simulator technology. The collaboration, which will provide a turnkey cloud service for simulation-based testing and verification of Autoware, is expected to contribute significantly to the deployment of emerging autonomous driving technologies.

  • MicroEJ is Releasing Studio V5 for Fast Open Source Embedded Software Development

    Today, MicroEJ is releasing the new V5 version of its free Studio, an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for embedded software design, based on multi-languages, multi-libraries, and multi-app secure containers.

    It represents two years of intense efforts in close collaboration with its ecosystem of partners, customers and developers, to optimize software assets creation related to domains such as Security, User Interface, Communication, Numeric, and Simulation.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers: BlueTooth, Spectre/Meltdown and Huawei Disputes

  • BlueTooth Security Risks

    Security risks involving bluetooth vulnerabilities include techniques known as: bluebugging, bluesnarfing, bluejacking, denial of service and exploits for different holes. When a device is configured in discoverable an attacker may try to apply these techniques. Today mobile security was strongly increased and most attacks fail, yet sometimes security holes are discovered and new exploits emerge. As mobile devices prevent the user from installing unmonitored software freely most of attacks are difficult to carry out. This tutorial describes the most common Bluetooth attacks, the tools used to carry out these attacks and the security measures users can take to prevent them. [...] While bluetooth attacks aren’t widely used (when compared with other types of attacks like phishing or DDOS) almost every person carrying a mobile device is a potential victim, therefore in our countries most people are exposed, also through bluetooth, to sensitive data leak. On the other hand most manufacturers already patched devices to protect them from almost all attacks described above, but they only can issue a fix after the vulnerability was discovered and published (like with any vulnerability). While there is not defensive software the best solution is to keep the device turned off in public spaces, since most attacks require a short range you can use the device safely in private places. I hope you found this tutorial on Bluetooth Security Risks useful. Keep following LinuxHint for more tips and updates on Linux and networking.

  • Arm Has Many Changes On Tap For Linux 5.6 From Spectre/Meltdown Bits To New RNG

    While the Linux 5.5 kernel isn't even released yet, it's ideally coming out on Sunday should there not be a one week delay. But in any event Arm's Will Deacon has already sent in the pull request of the ARM architecture changes for Linux 5.6.

  • The Pentagon pushes back on Huawei ban in bid for ‘balance’

    Huawei may have just found itself an ally in the most unexpected of places. According to a new report out of The Wall Street Journal, both the Defense and Treasury Departments are pushing back on a Commerce Department-led ban on sales from the embattled Chinese hardware giant. That move, in turn, has reportedly led Commerce Department officials to withdraw a proposal set to make it even more difficult for U.S.-based companies to work with Huawei. Defense Secretary Mark Esper struck a fittingly pragmatic tone while speaking with the paper, noting, “We have to be conscious of sustaining those [technology] companies’ supply chains and those innovators. That’s the balance we have to strike.”

today's howtos

Devices/Embedded With GNU/Linux

Easy Librem 5 App Development: Flashlight

In my first post on easy application development on the Librem 5 I discussed how to turn a simple shell script that takes a screenshot into a full graphical app with only a few extra lines of code. In this post I will follow up with an even simpler application that took about twenty minutes to write with much of that time involved in reading documentation. My Bright Idea The interesting thing about smart phones is how many other devices they have replaced beyond a regular phone. For instance, there used to be a market for small, pocket-sized digital cameras, but now many people just use the cameras on their smart phones. While some people still do keep a pocket flashlight with them, many people just use the light on their smart phone. I realized that a flashlight app would be another great way to showcase just how easy it is to develop applications for the Librem 5. As applications go the requirements are pretty simple: you need a button to turn on the light, a button to turn off the light, and a button to close the app. Read more