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NPU-equipped Rockchip RV1109 debuts on dev boards and cameras

JWIPC unveiled three “R19x” SBCs that run Linux on Rockchip’s dual -A7, 1.2-TOPS NPU equipped RV1109 camera SoC. Meanwhile, Firefly released two “CAM-C11x” cameras based on the RV1109 and similar quad-core, 2.0-TOPS RV1126. Shenzhen-based JWIPC, which we last covered back in 2014 with its Intel Bay Trail based S015 Dual System signage player, has posted product pages for three development boards built around Rockchip’s new RV1109 camera SoC (translated). The R19x boards are aimed at security access point face recognition applications. The R19S and mini-PCIe and SIM-equipped R19F are 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX SBCs while the R19N has a smaller 100 x 60mm footprint. Read more

Another Sudo Root Privilege Escalation Vulnerability Got Patched, Update Now

Sudo 1.9.5p2 was released today and it addresses two security issues. The first, CVE-2021-3156 (a.k.a. Baron Samedit), was discovered by Qualys Research Labs and could allow local users (sudoers and non-sudoers) to obtain unintended access to the root (system administrator) account. In addition, the new release patches CVE-2021-23239, a vulnerability discovered in Sudo’s sudoedit utility, which could allow a local attacker to bypass file permissions and determine if a directory exists or not. This security flaw affected Sudo versions before 1.9.5. Read more

Plasma Browser Integration 1.8

I’m pleased to announce the immediate availability of Plasma Browser Integration version 1.8 on the Chrome Web Store as well as Firefox Add-Ons page. This release was originally intended to be just a bugfix update, but instead comes with new features, the usual slew of bug fixes and translation updates, but more importantly: it’s now available on the Microsoft Edge store (needs Plasma 5.21)! Read more

RHEL no-cost* vs openSUSE Leap

Ever since Red Hat announced that they are changing the development model of CentOS and making it an upstream project rather than downstream, it left many CentOS users frowning. No matter what argument brought forward, CentOS users, especially running production machines, relied on the stability of an enterprise-grade Linux distribution. Compiled from RHEL sources, CentOS offered such stability that it powered many web servers and enjoyed a massive 20% share of the top 500 supercomputers of the world. Read more