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Games: Pokémon Go, Playscii, Trains & Things and More

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Gaming
  • Pokémon Go never went away — 2019 was its most lucrative year ever

    According to mobile analytics firm Sensor Tower, Pokémon Go had a record year in 2019, taking in an estimated $900 million through in-app purchases. That means Pokémon Go has surpassed its launch year in revenue after seeing a drop off in both players and spending back in 2017. It’s a rare comeback feat for a free-to-play game, many of which are flash-in-the-pan successes and fade into obscurity.

  • If you want to make some ASCII art, animations and games check out Playscii

    Playscii from developer JP LeBreton seems like a sweet open source application, giving you some handy tools for making ASCII art and it also acts as a game engine too.

    Cross-platform so it supports Linux, macOS and Windows along with the code available under the MIT license there's not really any restrictions on what you do with it. Being able to convert existing images is probably my favourite feature though, it's a lot of fun to play with. Not just for game developers who need some ASCII art, but it's simple enough for anyone to use. Converting game screenshots to make awesome backgrounds, logos and whatever else.

  • Multiplayer economic strategy game 'Trains & Things' releasing this month

    Currently in development by bitshift in Godot Engine, Trains & Things is a multiplayer economic real-time strategy game. The developer has now announced it's going to enter Early Access on January 24.

    Trains & Things has you run a logistics company by your self or with friends. A game of supply, demand and risk as you try to keep the money coming in as you expand across the map. The focus is on the online (or LAN) play, with cross-platform multiplayer between Linux and Windows.

  • Upcoming eco tycoon sim 'Among Ripples: Shallow Waters' has a demo out

    Help maintain a delicate ecosystem in Among Ripples: Shallow Waters, an in-development eco tycoon sim with a focus on lakes and rivers. Originally announced as Among Ripples 2, they changed the title back in November.

    Recently, Eat Create Sleep put up a demo (with a Linux build) as they're preparing to launch a Kickstarter campaign at some point early this year. The prototype demo gives a small but interesting slice into what to expect and it's actually pretty relaxing, quite impressive considering they say it's just a "proof of concept". Reminds me of the atmosphere in Megaquarium with it being very peaceful.

  • Upcoming supernatural horror adventure 'ASYLUM' development sounds good

    While it doesn't yet have a release date, it does sound like development on the upcoming supernatural horror adventure 'ASYLUM' is going well.

    After announcing last month that the team at Senscape were awarded an Epic MegaGrant, the founder Agustín Cordes said on Twitter that ASYLUM now has "[…] an internal demo with releasable quality and solid performance on Windows 32/64, Mac and Linux. All the platforms that we promised!". That's good news for Linux gamers, as it sounds like it's going to be in a good state when it's released.

More in Tux Machines

Gopher: When Adversarial Interoperability Burrowed Under the Gatekeepers' Fortresses

In the early 1990s, personal computers did not arrive in an "Internet-ready" state. Before students could connect their systems to UMN's network, they needed to install basic networking software that allowed their computers to communicate over TCP/IP, as well as dial-up software for protocols like PPP or SLIP. Some computers needed network cards or modems, and their associated drivers. That was just for starters. Once the students' systems were ready to connect to the Internet, they still needed the basic tools for accessing distant servers: FTP software, a Usenet reader, a terminal emulator, and an email client, all crammed onto a floppy disk (or two). The task of marshalling, distributing, and supporting these tools fell to the university's Microcomputer Center. For the university, the need to get students these basic tools was a blessing and a curse. It was labor-intensive work, sure, but it also meant that the Microcomputer Center could ensure that the students' newly Internet-ready computers were also configured to access the campus network and its resources, saving the Microcomputer Center thousands of hours talking students through the configuration process. It also meant that the Microcomputer Center could act like a mini App Store, starting students out on their online journeys with a curated collection of up-to-date, reliable tools. That's where Gopher comes in. While the campus mainframe administrators had plans to selectively connect their systems to the Internet through specialized software, the Microcomputer Center had different ideas. Years before the public had heard of the World Wide Web, the Gopher team sought to fill the same niche, by connecting disparate systems to the Internet and making them available to those with little-to-no technical expertise—with or without the cooperation of the systems they were connecting. Gopher used text-based menus to navigate "Gopherspace" (all the world's public Gopher servers). The Microcomputer Center team created Gopher clients that ran on Macs, DOS, and in Unix-based terminals. The original Gopher servers were a motley assortment of used Macintosh IIci systems running A/UX, Apple's flavor of Unix. The team also had access to several NeXT workstations. Read more Also: The Things Industries Launches Global Join Server for Secure LoRaWAN

IBM/Red Hat and POWER9/OpenBMC

  • Network Automation: Why organizations shouldn’t wait to get started

    For many enterprises, we don’t need to sing the praises of IT automation - they already get it. They understand the value of automation, have invested in a platform and strategy, and have seen first-hand the benefits IT automation can deliver. However, unlike IT automation, according to a new report from Forrester Research 1, network automation is still new territory for many organizations. The report, "Jump-Start Your Network Automation," found that 56% of global infrastructure technology decision makers have implemented/are implementing or are expanding/upgrading their implementation of automation software, while another 19% plan to implement it over the next 12 months. But those same organizations that are embracing IT automation haven’t necessarily been able to take that same initiative when it comes to automating their networks. Even if they know it will be beneficial to them, the report found that organizations often struggle with even the most basic questions around automating their networks.

  • Using a story’s theme to inform the filmmaking: Farming for the Future

    The future of farming belongs to us all. At least that’s the message I got from researching Red Hat’s most recent Open Source Stories documentary, Farming for the Future. As a self-proclaimed city boy, I was intrigued by my assignment as director of the short documentary, but also felt like the subject matter was worlds away. If it did, in fact, belong to all of us how would we convey this to a general audience? How could we use the film’s theme to inform how we might approach the filmmaking to enhance the storytelling?

  • Raptor Rolls Out New OpenBMC Firmware With Featureful Web GUI For System Management

    While web-based GUIs for system management on server platforms with BMCs is far from anything new, Raptor Computing Systems with their libre POWER9 systems does now have a full-functioning web-based solution for their OpenBMC-powered systems and still being fully open-source. As part of Raptor Computing Systems' POWER9 desktops and servers being fully open-source down to the firmware/microcode and board designs, Raptor has used OpenBMC for the baseboard management controllers but has lacked a full-featured web-based system management solution on the likes of the Talos II and Blackbird systems up until now.

  • Introduction to open data sets and the importance of metadata

    More data is becoming freely available through initiatives such as institutions and research publications requiring that data sets be freely available along with the publications that refer to them. For example, Nature magazine instituted a policy for authors to declare how the data behind their published research can be accessed by interested readers. To make it easier for tools to find out what’s in a data set, authors, researchers, and suppliers of data sets are being encouraged to add metadata to their data sets. There are various forms for metadata that data sets use. For example, the US Government data.gov site uses the standard DCAT-US Schema v1.1 whereas the Google Dataset Search tool relies mostly on schema.org tagging. However, many data sets have no metadata at all. That’s why you won’t find all open data sets through search, and you need to go to known portals and explore if portals exist in the region, city, or topic of your interest. If you are deeply curious about metadata, you can see the alignment between DCAT and schema.org in the DCAT specification dated February 2020. The data sets themselves come in various forms for download, such as CSV, JSON, GeoJSON, and .zip. Sometimes data sets can be accessed through APIs. Another way that data sets are becoming available is through government initiatives to make data available. In the US, data.gov has more than 250,000 data sets available for developers to use. A similar initiative in India, data.gov.in, has more than 350,000 resources available. Companies like IBM sometimes provide access to data, like weather data, or give tips on how to process freely available data. For example, an introduction to NOAA weather data for JFK Airport is used to train the open source Model Asset eXchange Weather Forecaster (you can see the model artifacts on GitHub). When developing a prototype or training a model during a hackathon, it’s great to have access to relevant data to make your solution more convincing. There are many public data sets available to get you started. I’ll go over some of the ways to find them and provide access considerations. Note that some of the data sets might require some pre-processing before they can be used, for example, to handle missing data, but for a hackathon, they are often good enough.

  • Red Hat Helps Omnitracs Redefine Logistics And Transportation Software

    Fleet management technology provider Omnitracs, LLC, has delivered its Omnitracs One platform on the foundation of Red Hat OpenShift. Using the enterprise Kubernetes platform along with Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform, Omnitracs One is a cloud-native offering and provides an enhanced user experience with a clear path towards future innovations. With Red Hat’s guidance, Omnitracs said it was able to embrace a shift from on-premises development technologies to cloud-native services, improving overall operations and creating a more collaborative development process culture.

today's howtos

Dev kit and SMARC module run Linux on a Rockchip PX30

Adlink unveiled an “I-Pi SMARC Dev Kit” that runs Linux on a “LEC-PX30” SMARC module with Rockchip’s quad -A35 PX30 SoC. The kit has RPi-like 40-pin GPIO and Intel’s MRAA HAL and UPM code for abstraction. Adlink announced a maker-like Linux development kit for sensor prototyping built around a new SMARC form-factor LEC-PX30 module with Rockchip’s PX30 SoC. The Industrial-Pi (I-Pi) SMARC kit is supported by a wiki site with extensive software documentation, Linux images, and links to GitHub hosted software, but there’s no indication this is an open hardware project. The wiki also has a teaser page for a “Neuron Pi” module, which Adlink plans to announce next week at Embedded World along with a Vizi-AI module. Both are SMARC modules equipped with an Intel Movidius Myriad X VPU. Read more