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Sailfish SDK 3.0 is now available

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This new release contains several updates for the entire SDK system. Some of the changes are already visible through the interface within this update, but more will become available in future releases building on the enabling features we’ve included in this release. An example of these upcoming changes is the possibility to support different kinds of virtualization technologies for the build engine and the emulators.

Command line interface

Our command line tool (sfdk), which we already introduced in version 2.2, receives an upgrade in this release. As a result of these changes it is now possible to use the SDK within a continuous integration environment.
For users who are comfortable using Qt Creator you can continue using it as before. However, if you want to script parts of the development process, or if you’re just happiest working from the command line, then sfdk provides important benefits. We’ll look briefly at some of the things you can do below to give you a taste.

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We hope you enjoy using the new SDK tools and we look forward to bringing you the other improvements we’ve been working on in the future.

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