Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSUSE: Board, Etherpad, Tumbleweed

Filed under
SUSE
  • Q&A: What it is like to be on the openSUSE Board

    You already know what a fantastic platform openSUSE is for doing just about anything with Linux. So what’s behind that easy-to-use and super powerful distribution that we know and love, and have come to rely on. In many minds there is a perception that its simply SUSE with the proprietary code stripped out. It’s true that a lot of the development work does flow down from SUSE but there is also an active community of dedicated volunteers who drive and make the project work, adding the goodies we have come to take for granted for the myriad of uses we have come to rely on it for.

    It’s election time at openSUSE and the election board asked an existing board member Gertjan who has agreed to step up again and run for re-election of what it is like to be on the board. Below is a transcript of an offline interview between fellow election committee member Edwin and Gertjan highlighting what it’s like to be on the board of openSUSE.

    Edwin: Would you like to tell us about your daily schedule and how does being an openSUSE Board member impacts on that?

    Gertjan: To be fair, my daily schedule varies a lot, depending on what is on my table. Most of the time this leaves me with enough spare time to do board related things. But before I was on board, I spent that time in openSUSE too, i.e. forums, IRC etc., so the main impact on my daily schedule were the bi-weekly video conference calls. For the rest I just spread the spare time a bit differently. It does take a couple of hours though, on an average week.

    Edwin: Do you still remember what motivated you to step up for Board candidacy the first time? And then why a second time?

  • Etherpad updated (again)

    As you might have noticed on our status page, our etherpad instance at https://etherpad.opensuse.org/ was updated to the latest version 3 days ago.

    But this time,we did not only upgrade the package (which lives, btw, in our openSUSE:infrastructure project), we also migrated the underlying database.

    As often, the initial deployment was done with a "just for testing" mindset by someone, who afterward left his little project. And - also as often - these kind of deployments suddenly became productive. This means - in turn - that our openSUSE heroes team suddenly gets tickets for services we originally did neither set up, nor maintain.

  • Nathan Wolf: Building an AMD Server and Game Machine out of Yester-Year's Parts

    Operating System | openSUSE Tumbleweed

    There really wasn’t any other choice. I need long term reliability and I am not interested in reinstalling the operating system. I know, through personal experience, that Tumbleweed works well with server applications, is very tolerant to delayed updates and will just keep chugging away.

    [...]

    This was an area that took me several months of research and reading. My criteria was that I had to have Storage Array BTRFS Raid 10. This afforded me a lot of redundancy but also a lot of flexibility. This will allow me to slowly upgrade my dries capacity as they begin to fail.

    When deciding the file system, I did a lot of research into my options. I talked to a lot of people. ZFS lost consideration due to the lack of support in Linux. I am perfectly aware that the development is done primarily within Linux now but it is not part of the mainline kernel and I do not want to risk the module breaking when the kernel updates. So, that was a non-starter.

    [...]

    Although this computer has only been up and running for about two months, I am slowly adding more services and functions to it. For now, it is pretty light, but in a few short months, that will most certainly start growing. I am very happy happy with the sub-$700 build for a computer system that has met or exceeded my expectations. It was a fun first complete, from ground up, scrap-together assembly that really was a gamble. I am pleased with how well openSUSE Tumbleweed runs on it and that I have had no disturbances with any operating system updates.

    Often, after a project, you will review it, have an “After Action Review” and ask yourself, “What would I do differently if I were doing this again.” I can honestly say, there is nothing I would change. I like everything about this machine. I would, perhaps, like more storage space as I have already gobbled up 2.5 TiB of my 5.5 TiB of storage space. Reviewing what I spent and the additional cost of the larger storage, I would have still made the same decision. So, back to would I change anything? No, I think I made the right decision. I do have upgrades planned for the future but that is a project for the fall. This machine truly fits my needs, even if much of the hardware is yester-years retired bits.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 21.04 Is The "Hirsute Hippo", Releasing On 22 April

Following last week's Ubuntu 20.10 "Groovy Gorilla" release, Ubuntu 21.04 development is now getting underway as the Hirsute Hippo. Succeeding the "GG" series is Ubuntu 21.04 the Hirsute (Hairy) Hippo in following their usual naming convention. This is now the third time of Ubuntu seeing a "HH" release following the Ubuntu 5.04 Hoary Hedgehog and Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron releases. The release schedule for Ubuntu 21.04 puts the official release on 22 April, the beta on 1 April, and the feature freeze on 25 February as the prominent dates of the cycle. The Ubuntu 21.04 toolchain upload is beginning tomorrow and expect more Debian changes to begin flowing into the Ubuntu Hirsute archive shortly. Hirsute uploads can be monitored via Launchpad. Read more Also: Ubuntu 21.04 gets the codename ‘Hirsute Hippo' The Ubuntu 21.04 Codename Revealed — It’s Hairy ‘n Huge! And We’re Off: Ubuntu 21.04 Development Begins

What the growing OEM support means for the future of Linux

When I first started using Linux in the late 1990s, getting Linux to successfully run on a laptop was the stuff of legends. You might be able to get a distribution installed, but having functional wireless connectivity or sound might well be beyond your skill level. Sometimes it'd mean compiling a custom kernel or installing/patching firmware. No matter what route you took, it required time and effort enough that when you did finally get everything working as it should, you felt like a rock star. Those were the days. These days, Linux just works. It's a rare occasion that I run into a piece of hardware that Linux cannot handle. Sure, you might have to install a driver now and then, but even those bits of software are readily available. Read more

today's howtos

  • Introduction to Blender for Beginners – Linux Hint

    If you are a 3D computer graphics or animation enthusiast and are in search of some 3D modeling software, then you have come to the right place. There are many 3D modeling software programs available, many are good and are doing their jobs quite well, but they all come with a hefty price tag and high subscription fees. There is no need to pay heavy subscription fees when you have a free and powerful 3D creation tool at your fingertips, known as a Blender. Blender is a popular and open-source 3D creation software that can be used in 3D printer designs. It is a robust program that supports the entire pipeline of 3D creation, which includes modeling, shading, rigging, animation, and rendering. There is no need to get any supplementary programs because Blender lets you make games and edit videos. Blender is quite easy to learn and has a great community to support you. This article introduces the basics of the Blender software to beginners. We will discuss the Blender user interface and some essential shortcut keys. If you are a beginner and want to start 3D modeling in Blender, then this article is for you.

  • How To Install Wireguard on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Wireguard on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Wireguard is an open-source, dependable, advanced, VPN tunneling software you can install and use right now to create a secure, point-to-point connection to a server. It is cross-platform and can run almost anywhere, including Linux, Windows, Android, and macOS. Wireguard is a peer-to-peer VPN. it does not use the client-server model. Depending on its configuration, a peer can act as a traditional server or client. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Wireguard on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How To Use Dockerfiles In Docker - Anto Online

    This post will explain how to use Dockerfiles in Docker. Learn how to launch Wordpress and MariaDB using your own Dockerfile.

  • How To Install Wine on Linux Mint 20 - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Wine on Linux Mint 20, as well as some extra required package by Wine

  • How to Extract and Open a .gz File in Linux Command Line – Linux Hint

    We know that a file in a computer system can be as small as a few Bytes or as large as a thousand Gigabytes. When you want to transmit a file from one end to another, its size plays a very important role in deciding whether you want to send it as it is or compress it. The .gz file format is a very commonly used compressed file format for the Linux operating system. Today, we will explore the methods of extracting and opening a .gz file in Linux.

  • How to Install and Configure an FTP server (vsftpd) with SSL/TLS on Ubuntu 20.04

    In this tutorial, we will learn how to install and configure an FTP Server using vsftpd on an Ubuntu 20.04 based server. We will also learn how to sec...

  • How to Reset Forgotten Root Password in Ubuntu? – Linux Hint

    In any UNIX or Linux system, the root account is the top in the hierarchy. It holds the utmost power over the system. For any system change, the root has to grant permission. The root user can also override any user’s permission and read or write data. Because the root account holds so much power, it is important to protect it from unwanted access.In the case of Ubuntu, the root account is disabled by default. However, you can still perform system changes. To do so, you need to know the root password. The problem arises when you have forgotten the root password.

Games: Caesar III, Moonshell Island, The Last Relic

  • Julius, the open source re-implementation of Caesar III has a new major release | GamingOnLinux

    Caesar III continues to live on and get improvements on modern systems thanks to open source, with the Julius game engine continuing to mature. On October 27, Julius 1.5.0 was released continuing to upgrade the experience. The current status is that it should be fully playable, with it largely focused on accuracy with the original game but with plenty of UI enhancements.

  •   
  • Upcoming RPG 'Moonshell Island' will have you fight giant tomatoes with a whisk | GamingOnLinux

    You've faced monsters before aplenty but what about nomsters? Moonshell Island looks and sounds like a delightful and rather quirky upcoming RPG. Set on a whimsical island, Moonshell Island will feature a cast of charming characters, a "satisfying" action-battle system, plenty of mini-games and a "heartwarming tale of achieving dreams, supporting friends, and building a community". On a peaceful island these strange nomsters threaten the peace so "you must journey to find the source of the trouble and recruit the islanders to a safe haven, Crabby’s Cabana Club. As the club population grows, more services become available to aid you on your quest to uncover not only the secrets of the island, but also of yourself".

  •   
  • The Last Relic is an upcoming RPG inspired by Earthbound and Chrono Trigger | GamingOnLinux

    Enjoyed classics like Earthbound and Chrono Trigger? Take a look at The Last Relic, an in-development RPG from developer Christopher Hall Guay. "The Last Relic follows the tale of a young girl named Ellie who is transported from her cozy, American life to a foreign realm of magic and monsters. Lost and alone, she wanders this new land aimlessly, wishing only to get back home. She's attacked by monsters only to be rescued by a young man named Dorian. It's here Ellie learns that she is far from Earth, in the land of Relics and Relic Hunters. Why was she brought here? And will she ever make it back home?"