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Flathub 2019 roundup

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Software

One could say that the Flathub team is working silently behind the scenes most of the time and it wouldn't be far from the truth. Unless changes are substantial, they are rarely announced elsewhere than under a pull request or issue on GitHub. Let's change it a bit and try to summarize what was going on with Flathub over the last year.

Beta branch and test builds

2019 started off strong. In February, several improvements to general workflow but also how things under the hood work landed. Maintainers gained the ability to sign-in to buildbot to manage the builds and start new ones without having to push new commits. A delay has been introduced between finishing the build and publishing it to the stable repository to the possibility to test new build locally and also publish it faster or scrap it altogether. The initial delay was 24 hours but as it was too confusing, it was shortened to 3 hours.

Perhaps most importantly, the changes made it possible to publish test builds of pull requests and completely new applications. Additionally, Flathub gained support for publishing applications to separate beta remote.

Alex wrote more about the changes on his blog.

Read more

Also: Shell aliases for Flatpak applications

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