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Bandwhich – A Network Bandwidth Utilization Tool for Linux

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Software

Bandwhich, formerly known as “what”, is a terminal utility written in Rust programming language, which is used for monitoring current network bandwidth utilization by the process, connection, and remote IP/hostname. It sniffs a specified network interface and tracks IP packet size, cross-referencing it with the /proc filesystem on Linux and lsof on macOS.

Recommended Read: 16 Useful Bandwidth Monitoring Tools to Analyze Network Usage in Linux

Bandwhich is responsive to the terminal window size, shows lesser information if there isn’t much room for it. Also, it will strive to resolve IP addresses to their hostname in the background using reverse DNS.

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