Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Android Leftovers

Huawei Still Sold More Phones Than Apple In 2019

  • Huawei Still Sold More Phones Than Apple In 2019, But Admits 2020 Will Be ‘Difficult Year’

    Huawei’s smartphone business had a milestone year in 2018, as the company reached the 200 million phone shipment mark for the first time. It was also enough to push the Chinese tech giant ahead of Apple to become the world’s No. 2 smartphone brand by units sold. This year, despite being placed on the United States’ “entity list”—essentially an export blacklist—Huawei still managed to sell more phones than Apple, and likely remain in the number two spot.

    In an internal memo to employees that was shared with select media, Huawei’s rotating chairman Eric Xu announced today that the company sold 240 million phones in 2019. Apple, according to analysts, will finish the year at around 185 to 190 million phones sold. Samsung hasn’t announced figures yet, but it very likely remains at the top spot.

    Xu also announced in the memo that Huawei’s total revenue in 2019—which includes the company’s carrier business and enterprise business in addition to consumer gadgets—topped 850 billion yuan (around 121 billion), an 18% increase over 2018.

    These numbers are surprising, considering the Google export ban could have been a crippling blow to the company’s global phone business. But while Huawei declined to provide detailed breakdowns of its 2019 phone sales such as how many phones were sold outside of China, Xu does say in the memo that the company’s record phone sales are likely due to momentum carried over from early 2019 before essentially being banned from using Google, and even concedes that the company won’t grow in 2020 like it did in 2019.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Hudi powering data lake efforts at Walmart and Disney+ Hotstar

    The open source Apache Hudi data lake project is helping power large deployments at a number of big enterprises, including Uber, Walmart and Disney+ Hotstar. Apache Hudi (Hadoop Upserts, Deletes and Incrementals) is a technology that was originally developed at Uber in 2016 and became an open source project the following year. In June 2021, Hudi became a Top-Level Project at the Apache Software Foundation, which was a major milestone for the project's maturity. Hudi provides a series of capabilities for data lakes, including a table format and services that enable organizations to effectively manage data for data queries, operations and analytics.

  • Aditi’s Open Source Journey

    Hi! I am Aditi from India. According to Wikipedia, India annually produces 1M engineering graduates! (Yep! That’s a lot). And I am one of the 1M graduating in 2022. Just like most people, when I started studying back in 2018, I was pretty lost! I spent my first three semesters trying to find a perfect road-map to being a good developer in a sea of infinite possibilities, skimming through various options. I wasn’t sure what I was going to do, I just knew, I liked being in the field! It took me 1.5 years to realize that there is no perfect roadmap, it’s just as simple as when you start something, you like it, you stay consistent and end up in the right place! [...] One of the best pieces of advice I received from her: “Switch from Windows to Linux!” [...] I finished my outreachy initial application and devoted all my time in finding the perfect organization. That’s when I found GNOME. The skills required were C++ and JS – two languages I knew I had some experience in and liked working with. The GNOME community was indeed awesome. I never felt like an outsider. And that’s when I met Philip Chimento, one of the best mentors I’ve ever had. I remember being super excited when I finished building my first small app using GJS! (It just read a file and returned the number of lines, but it worked and that felt like a good enough reason to go on! :D). I couldn’t wait to officially start my internship with GNOME but my Outreachy initial application got rejected again because of time commitment issues.

  • The AI4K12 project: Big ideas for AI education
  • Hit roadblock building EasyArch

    I had not attempted this previously, partly because Arch is a rolling release. However, a few days ago I discovered that Arch keeps snapshots of all the packages, going back many years.

  • China’s Olympics App Is Horribly Insecure - Schneier on Security

    China is mandating that athletes download and use a health and travel app when they attend the Winter Olympics next month. Citizen Lab examined the app and found it riddled with security holes.

  • Fileless Malware on Linux: Anatomy of an Attack | LinuxSecurity.com

    Recent years have demonstrated that Windows users are not the only ones who should be concerned about malware. Linux is becoming an increasingly popular target among malware operators due to the growing popularity of the open-source OS and the high-value devices it powers worldwide. Security researchers from AT&T Alien Labs are now warning that “cyber gangs have started infecting Linux machines via a fileless malware installation technique that until recently was more commonly used against Windows-based systems”. So what exactly is fileless malware and how does a fileless malware attack on Linux work? This article will provide you with answers to these questions by honing in on the anatomy of a Linux fileless malware attack - equipping you with the knowledge necessary to secure your systems and your data against this stealthy and malicious threat. Let’s begin by exploring the concept of fileless malware.

  • Top Five Arch-Based Linux Distros 2022 - Invidious

    I love Arch Linux and Arch-based Linux distributions, mainly because of the software availability and the rolling release model. I have looked at dozens of Arch-based distros over the years, but what do I consider the top five Arch-based distros?

Programming Leftovers

  • Announcing Rust 1.58.1 | Rust Blog

    The Rust team has published a new point release of Rust, 1.58.1. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software. If you have a previous version of Rust installed via rustup, getting Rust 1.58.1 is as easy as: rustup update stable If you don't have it already, you can get rustup from the appropriate page on our website.

  • Using Python to access a Solid Pod

    We can host these Pods in personal servers or at any provider. Everything is tied up based on the user identity, called WebID. It is an HTTP URI described as RDF document. You can decide who/what can access your data. Applications/humans can use Solid authentication and identify to the Pod server to access the data using open protocols.

  • My Favorite Warnings: qw | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    When I first came to Perl I thought the qw{} construction was pretty neat. Give it a bunch of white-space-delimited text and it gives you back a list separated on the blanks.

  • PHP version 8.0.15 and 8.1.2 - Remi's RPM repository

    RPMs of PHP version 8.1.2 are available in remi-php81 repository for Fedora 33-35 and Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS). RPMs of PHP version 8.0.15 are available in remi repository for Fedora 35 and remi-php80 repository for Fedora 33-34 and Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

  • What you need to know about fuzz testing and Go | Opensource.com

    The usage of Go is growing rapidly. It is now the preferred language for writing cloud-native software, container software, command-line tools, databases, and more. Go has had built-in support for testing for quite some time now. It makes writing tests and running them using the Go tool relatively easy.

This End Times Cyberdeck Is Apocalypse-Ready'

In the cyberdeck world, some designs are meant to evoke a cyberpunk vibe, an aesthetic that’s more lighthearted than serious. Some cyberdecks, though, are a little more serious about hardening their designs against adverse conditions. That’s where something like the ARK-io SurvivalDeck comes into play. Granted, there does seem to be at least a little lightheartedness at play with the aptly named [techno-recluse]’s design. It’s intended to be an “Apocalypse Repository of Knowledge”, which may be stretching the point a bit. But it does contain an impressive amount of tech — wide-band software defined radio (SDR) covering HF to UHF, GPS module, a sensor for air pressure, temperature, and humidity, and a Raspberry Pi 3B running Kali Linux. Everything is housed in a waterproof ammo can; a 3D printed bezel holds an LCD touchscreen and a satisfying array of controls, displays and ports. The lid of the ammo can holds a keyboard, which was either custom-made to precisely fit the lid or was an incredibly lucky find. Read more