Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Display MythTV on an HDTV

Filed under
HowTos

Two major components come into play when you attempt to display MythTV content in HD—the video output device in your MythTV box and whatever high-definition display you use—especially the inputs it makes available. In order from most to least preferable, the most desirable inputs you'll want to use on an HDTV are as follows:

1. DVI or HDMI (both rank more or less the same)
2. VGA
3. Component video

The distinctions between items two and three are fairly minimal, and some people actually prefer Component over VGA. In most cases, VGA is easier to use when interconnecting a computer and a high-definition display (unless you have an Nvidia GeForce 6 or later model graphics card that comes with a Component dongle), while Component often delivers a slightly better picture. How you feed these various inputs is where things get interesting. Regardless of which type of input you feed, Nvidia cards remain far and away the most popular and best-supported output devices for viewing HDTV content.

Remember also that high-end Nvidia cards are high-end because of their superior 3D capabilities (which also contributes to their high cost). Because 3D has relatively little value for a MythTV system, currently available low-end GeForce 5200 or 6200 cards work about as well as a brand new high-end GeForce 7900, as far as MythTV is concerned. In addition, lower-end cards are often available in fanless, passively cooled (and thus silent) packages, whereas high-end cards require active cooling from a relatively noisy high-speed fan.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

Ubuntu 16.04 Review: What’s New for Desktop Users

Ubuntu is a tricky distribution. As much as I love it on my home server, my desktop is a different ballgame. In my experience, releases between LTS versions have many new technologies that may or may not survive in the next LTS. There were many technologies or features that Canonical thought were ambitious -- HUD, experimenting with menus, online dash search, Ubuntu Software Center, etc. -- but they were abandoned. So, if I were to use Ubuntu on my desktop, I would still choose LTS. Read more

Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal

I started using Drupal because I needed an open source content management system (CMS) to use in several community projects. One of the projects I was involved with was just getting started and had narrowed its CMS selection down to either Drupal or Joomla. At the time I was using a different framework, but I had considered Drupal in the past and knew that I liked it a lot better than Joomla. I convinced them to go with the new Drupal 6 release and converted all of my other projects for consistency. I started working with Drush because I wanted a unified mechanism to work with local and remote sites. My first major contribution to Drush was site aliases and sql-sync in Drush 3. Read more