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Graphics: Mesa 20.0 Development, Mir Work and Radeon's Linux Limits

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 20.0-devel Intel Gallium3D Performance Benchmarks Are Looking Good For Ice Lake

    While the Mesa 20.0 cycle is quite young and still over one month to go until the feature freeze for this next quarterly installment of these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan Linux drivers, it's quite exciting already with the changes building up. In particular, on the Intel side they are still positioning for the Intel Gallium3D driver to become the new default on hardware of generations Broadwell and newer. Here is a quick look at how the Intel Gallium3D performance is looking compared to their legacy "i965" classic OpenGL driver that is the current default.

    As you should already know if you've been reading Phoronix for any real length of time, the new Intel Gallium3D driver is quite competitive and for supported generations is generally now ahead of their classic OpenGL driver. The Intel Gallium3D driver supports OpenGL 4.6 like the i965 driver and the lingering bugs are just being addressed before turning it on as the default Intel OpenGL Linux driver while i965 will be sticking around as the default for Haswell and older.

  • Ubuntu's Mir Display Stack Accomplished A Lot In 2019 For Being Discounted Two Years Ago

    Canonical's Alan Griffiths continues leading the Mir efforts and his team had a very busy 2019 continuing to push along Mir even though it's not featured on the Ubuntu desktop right now is still playing a big role at the company due to IoT use-cases like digital signage. Griffiths provided a look back at Mir in 2019 on Ubuntu Discourse. Here were some of the highlights:

  • AMD releases the Radeon 5500XT

    Now step forward almost six months and the drivers for the 5700 and 5500 lines still don’t exist. OK sure there are drivers for Ubuntu 18.04.03, and ONLY for Ubuntu 18.04.03, nothing newer.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to kill all user sessions on Linux using shell script

    There are multiple ways to automate the system administrator task on Linux. It drastically reduces human efforts and saves reasonable time. shell script is one of the methods to automate frequent jobs. For a scenario, you want to run a weekly job or EOD job to populate some data for reporting purposes. To do so, you need to kill all ssh sessions that are currently accessing the application on the system before beginning the job.

  • How to install GSnap in Audacity on a Chromebook - VST Plugins

    Today we are looking at how to install GSnap, a free VST plugin, in Audacity on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below. If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

  • How to Install GitLab on Debian 10 (Buster)

    GitLab is a free and opensource front-end Git repository that features a Wiki and an issue tracking feature. It allows you to host Git repositories on your own server and setup DevOps platform. In this guide, we are going to install GitLab CE (Community Edition) on Debian 10 (Buster) system.

  • Unix Tutorial - Annual Digest - 2020

    Wow, 2020 just flew by! With one lockdown after another, most of the year was spent working from home and checking local government websites for guidance around when schools and after-schools would re-open. I didn’t blog as much as I hoped but stayed sane and otherwise productive - so can’t complain much about 2020.

Wine Developers Are Working On A New Linux Kernel Sync API To Succeed ESYNC/FSYNC

While there is the prior "ESYNC" and "FSYNC" work pursued by Wine for the Linux kernel, it appears Wine developers are back to the drawing board in coming up with a Linux kernel implementation for Wine synchronization primitives that will address all their needs and match the Windows behavior well. CodeWeavers developer Zebediah Figura sent out a lengthy mailing list post on Sunday night outlining the current state and objectives of coming up with kernel-based Wine synchronization primitives. While the ESYNC/FSYNC patches were successful in improving the performance of many Windows games running on Linux, they are still working towards a more all encompassing solution and to match the behavior well for Windows and with optimal speed. Read more

Linux Weekly Roundup: Wine 6.0, Fedora i3 Spin, and More

Here’s this week’s (ending Jan 17, 2021) roundup series, curated for you from the Linux and the open-source world on application updates, new releases, distribution updates, major news, and upcoming highlights. Have a look. Read more

Linux 5.11-rc4

Things continue to look fairly normal for this release: 5.11-rc4 is
solidly average in size, and nothing particularly scary stands out.

In the diff itself, the new ampere modesetting support shows up fairly
clearly - it's one of those hardware enablement things that should be
entirely invisible to people who don't have that hardware, but it does
end up being about a fifth of the whole rc4 patch.

If you ignore that oddity, the rest looks pretty normal, with random
patches all over, and a lot of it being quite small. All the usual
suspects: drivers (gpu, sound, rdma, md, networking..) arch updates
(arm64, risc-v, x86), fiesystems (ext4, nfs, btrfs), core networking,
documentation and tooling. And just random fixes.

The appended shortlog gives the details as usual..

            Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.11-rc4 Released With NVIDIA RTX 30 Mode-Setting, Haswell GT1 Graphics Restored