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An Interview With Slax Creator Tomas Matejicek

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Debian

I was always in a need of some bootable operating system, which could be started on a broken computer or server to restore and backup data. I also wanted to impress my friends with a fully functional Linux desktop started from a removable media, which they can try without installing. But carrying full-sized CD was not much convenient, and floppy drives didn’t provide sufficient space. So my goal was to make a full featured Linux system, but small enough so it could fit those small 200MB mini CDs.

But since I was a beginner with Linux as well myself, I didn’t know much options to start with. All the distributions I tried at that time (Mandrake, Fedora) were too big, I didn’t know how to install minimalistic versions of them. Slackware provided very clever installer, which allowed me to select individual packages to install, so I started using Slackware as my base.

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