Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Programming: PHP, C++, Python and More

Filed under
Development
  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn PHP

    PHP has been at the helm of the web for many years. It’s an extremely popular, interpreted scripting language that is ideally suited for web development in part because it has an approachable syntax and supports different operating systems. This language powers millions of web sites on the net and is extremely well supported by its user community.

    PHP is also used as a general-purpose programming language. PHP code can be executed with a command-line interface (CLI) and to implement standalone graphical applications. CLI PHP programs often automate common tasks such as testing, deployment, and application administration. The language offers a very complete set of object-oriented programming features as well as support for functional programming. The latest TIOBE Index (August 2019 at time of writing) ranks PHP in 8th place, behind Java, C, C++, C#, Python, Visual Basic .NET, and JavaScript.

    The language is released under a non-copyleft free software license / open source license. The latest stable version adds lots of new features.

  • Intel's MKL-DNN/DNNL 2.0 Beta 3 Release Adds SYCL + Data Parallel C++ Compiler

    Intel's MKL-DNN Deep Neural Network Library (DNNL) that is open-source and catering to deep learning applications like Tensorflow, PyTorch, DeepLearning4J, and others is nearing its version 2.0 release. With DNNL 2.0 is now support for Data Parallel C++ as Intel's new language as part of their oneAPI initiative.

    MKL-DNN/DNNL 2.0 Beta 3 was released on Wednesday and to my knowledge is their first public test release of the forthcoming 2.0. Notable with DNNL 2.0 is supporting SYCL API extensions and interoperability now with SYCL code, the single-source C++-based programming language backed by The Khronos Group and a crucial to Intel's new oneAPI initiative.

  • Watch this machine made out of Lego sort other Lego using AI

    Dubbed the “Universal Lego Sorting Machine” by its creator, Daniel West, it’s a pretty neat contraption that’s far more useful than any of the Lego science projects I used to make. The machine is apparently able to use AI to sort Lego into one of 18 different buckets at a rate of “about one brick every two seconds.” West says he trained the neural network that sorts the bricks using 3D images of Lego parts, and he says the network can learn to recognize any piece as long as there’s a 3D image to train on.

  • Reactive programming, a new way of thinking

    Get to know Reactive Programming and Grace Jansen, co-author of a new O'Reilly report that introduces Reactive and Reactive Architecture.

    [...]

    At Devoxx Belgium, Grace gave a number of talks, including one about Reactive programming and the pitfalls, entitled “Reacting to the future of application architecture.” In the talk, she uses an analogy from biology, namely how bees live and function together. “I compare the behavior of bees with how we would like applications to function and meet the requirements and expectations of users.”

  • Future-proof monolithic applications with modular design

    DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about future-proofing applications from Eric Murphy and Ales Nosek, Architects with Red Hat Consulting.

    When building an MVP software application, you may immediately jump to a microservices architecture because it’s the new norm for building cloud-native applications. You may also be skeptical about starting off with a monolith because of the perception of such applications as relics of the past.

  • Merge Sort in Python

    Merge Sort is one of the most famous sorting algorithms. If you're studying Computer Science, Merge Sort, alongside Quick Sort is likely the first efficient, general-purpose sorting algorithm you have heard of. It is also a classic example of a divide-and-conquer category of algorithms.

  • Updates on Unoon in December 2019

    This Saturday evening, I sat with Unoon project after a few weeks, I was continuously running it, but, did not resume the development effort. This time Bhavin also joined me. Together, we fixed a location of the whitelist files issue, and unoon now also has a database (using SQLite), which stores all the historical process and connection information. In the future, we will provide some way to query this information.

  • Summarising, Aggregating, and Grouping data in Python Pandas

    In this post, I will talk about summarizing techniques that can be used to compile and understand the data. I will use Python library Pandas to summarize, group and aggregate the data in different ways.

    I will be using college.csv data which has details about university admissions.

More in Tux Machines

MX Linux is Now Available for Raspberry Pi [Download and Install Guide]

The lightweight and popular Linux distribution - MX Linux extended its reach. And MX Linux is now available for Raspberry Pi devices as a Beta image (Fluxbox-RaspberryPi Respin “Ragout” ) which you can try out on your devices right now. Here's how. Read more

Android Leftovers

Essential Utilities: Flash OS Images

Linux offers a gamut of open source small utilities that perform functions ranging from the mundane to the wonderful. In our eyes, it’s the breadth of these tools that help to make Linux a compelling operating system. For beginners to Linux the range of distributions can be daunting. Should I investigate Ubuntu, Arch Linux, openSUSE, elementaryOS, or even try Solus? A good way to experiment with Linux distributions and find the one that best fits your needs is to create a bootable SD card or USB drive flashed with the Linux distros. The tools featured in this article make this process simple and safe. They are all easy to use with a simple interface, and hard drive friendly. Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.10.10, 5.4.92, 4.19.170, 4.14.217, 4.9.253 , and 4.4.253

I'm announcing the release of the 5.10.10 kernel.

All users of the 5.10 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.10.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.10.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.4.92 Linux 4.19.170 Linux 4.14.217 Linux 4.9.253 Linux 4.4.253