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An Interview with Icculus

Filed under
Gaming

Ryan C. Gordon, also known as Icculus, is the one responsible for creating native Linux and Macintosh ports for a number of different popular games on the market. Some of the games he has worked on have included the Unreal 200X series, Call of Duty, Medal of Honor, America's Army, Postal 1/2, Battlefield 1942, and Serious Sam. Ryan is also the system administrator for over 100 open source developers that work on a countless number of open source projects. Icculus also maintains icculus.org, which is the home to a number of open source projects, hosting of different news items, and a number of different homepages. Read on as we speak with this very intriguing Linux developer.

Phoronix: Icculus, are you able to tell us a bit about yourself (when you are not involved with one of your Linux projects) and how you got involved with computers?

Icculus: I'm always involved in something. In many ways, my projects define me, both in terms of my day job, and the itches I have to scratch so I can sleep peacefully. I'm mostly recognized by the games I've worked on, but I'm much more pleased with the tools I've built, and the libraries I support that help _other_ people make cool things.

I'm currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, and work as a freelance developer; mostly I'm associated with Epic Games, but that's not really accurate. They're one of my favorite contracts, but what I do for a living is somewhat like mercenary prostitution...I spend a lot of energy trying to find games to bring to alternate platforms, like Linux and MacOS, and in my free time, I work on various open source projects, and other freebies like that...so I guess I'm a hooker with a heart of gold, sorta.

My childhood was totally uneventful, so I won't bore you with it.

Phoronix: Where did you receive your formal education for computers and how long have you been into Linux programming?

Full Interview.

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