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Drupal in Canada and in farmOS

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Drupal
  • Revitalizing the Canadian government’s online presence

    Many government branches rely on proprietary software to power their websites and digital services. Using licensed technology can leave users locked in to costly and outdated platforms that are not easily updated, says Chris Smith, the CEO of Ottawa digital agency OPIN Software.

    Several government organizations have teamed up with OPIN over the past year to make the switch to Drupal, providing a more streamlined and functional experience for Canadians and giving government IT managers more flexibility.

  • Open Source Technology Could Be a Boon to Farmers

    Chang, who started farming eight years ago and works full-time in information technology off-farm, searched for a different solution for his 14-acre organic vegetable and cut flower farm in northeastern Connecticut, finding software aimed at CSAs, which he doesn’t run, or marketing and sales, which he didn’t need. Then he discovered farmOS, a free, open source record-keeping software built on the web platform Drupal.

  • Open source technology could be a boon to farmers

    Robert Chang’s fellow small-scale farmers turn to each other when they need low-cost tech to stay organized as they plant dozens of varieties of vegetables each season and seek to consistently fill their community-supported agriculture (CSA) boxes each week.

    [...]

    In the case of farmOS, on the other hand, Chang says, “Nobody is mining it or monetizing it in any way. It’s yours. You can export it in whatever way you want.” And it is infinitely customizable, if you’re tech savvy. “Since it’s open source, you can change the code, if you want to do your own customizations.”

More in Tux Machines

Calibre 5.0 Ebook Manager Released with Text Highlighting Support, Dark Mode

Coming almost a year after the Calibre 4.0 series, Calibre 5.0 is here with some major changes. This include the ability to highlight text in the E-book viewer, which is one of the most requested feature for this powerful ebook manager. Users will be able to use colors when highlighting text in ebooks, as well as to use all sorts of text formatting and styles, including strikethrough and underline. In addition, you can even add notes to your highlights. All the highlights will be stored in the respective EPUB file, which makes them easy to share. In addition, you can browse all your highlights in the Calibre library using the Browse annotations tool. Read more

Android Leftovers

Compute module and dev kit aim Snapdragon 865 at AR/VR

Lantronix has launched 50 x 29mm “Open-Q 865XR SOM” and $995 dev kit that runs Android 10 on a 15-TOPS NPU equipped Snapdragon 865 with 6GB LPDDR5, 802.11ax, and triple MIPI-CSI interfaces. Intrinsyc, a subsidiary of Lantronix, has introduced an IoT-oriented compute module and development kit based on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 865 (SXR2130P) SoC. The $445 Open-Q 865XR SOM and $995 Open-Q 865XR SOM Development Kit follow Intrinsyc’s more smartphone-oriented Snapdragon 865 Mobile HDK. The Open-Q 865XR targets imaging intensive embedded applications including Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality (AR/VR) applications in AI machine learning, medical, gaming, logistics and retail sectors. Read more

Programming: Git and Qt

  • Understand the new GitLab Kubernetes Agent

    GitLab's current Kubernetes integrations were introduced more than three years ago. Their primary goal was to allow a simple setup of clusters and provide a smooth deployment experience to our users. These integrations served us well in the past years but at the same time its weaknesses were limiting for some important and crucial use cases.

  • GitLab Introduces the GitLab Kubernetes Agent

    The GitLab Kubernetes Agent (GKA), released in GitLab 13.4, provides a permanent communication channel between GitLab and the cluster. According to the GitLab blog, it is designed to provide a secure solution that allows cluster operators to restrict GitLab's rights in the cluster and does not require opening up the cluster to the Internet.

  • Git Protocol v2 Available at Launchpad

    After a few weeks of development and testing, we are proud to finally announce that Git protocol v2 is available at Launchpad! But what are the improvements in the protocol itself, and how can you benefit from that? The git v2 protocol was released a while ago, in May 2018, with the intent of simplifying git over HTTP transfer protocol, allowing extensibility of git capabilities, and reducing the network usage in some operations. For the end user, the main clear benefit is the bandwidth reduction: in the previous version of the protocol, when one does a “git pull origin master”, for example, even if you have no new commits to fetch from the remote origin, git server would first “advertise” to the client all refs (branches and tags) available. In big repositories with hundreds or thousands of refs, this simple handshake operation could consume a lot of bandwidth and time to communicate a bunch of data that would potentially be discarded by the client after. In the v2 protocol, this waste is no longer present: the client now has the ability to filter which refs it wants to know about before the server starts advertising it.

  • Qt Desktop Days 7-11 September

    We are happy to let you know that the very first edition of Qt Desktop Days 2020 was a great success! Having pulled together the event at very short notice, we were delighted at the enthusiastic response from contributors and attendees alike.

  • Full Stack Tracing Part 1

    Full stack tracing is a tool that should be part of every software engineer’s toolkit. It’s the best way to investigate and solve certain classes of hard problems in optimization and debugging. Because of the power and capability it gives the developer, we’ll be writing a series of blogs about it: when to use it, how to get it set up, how to create traces, and how to interpret results. Our goal is to get you capable enough to use full stack tracing to solve your tough problems too. Firstly, what is it? Full stack tracing is tracing on the full software stack, from the operating system to the application. By collecting profiling information (timing, process, caller, API, and other info) from the kernel, drivers, software frameworks, application, and JavaScript environments, you’re able to see exactly how the individual components of a system are interacting. That opens up areas of investigation that are impossible to achieve with standard application profilers, kernel debug messages, or even strategically inserted printf() commands. One way to think of full stack tracing is like a developer’s MRI machine that allows you to look into a running system without disturbing it to determine what is happening inside. (And unlike other low-level traces that we’ve written about before, full stack tracing provides a simpler way to view activity up and down the entire software stack.)