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Programming: Vagrant, CSV to JSON and Python Bits

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Development
  • A beginner's guide to using Vagrant

    Vagrant describes itself as "a tool for building and managing virtual machine environments in a single workflow. With an easy-to-use workflow and focus on automation, Vagrant lowers development environment setup time, increases production parity, and makes the 'works on my machine' excuse a relic of the past."

  • Convert CSV to JSON with miller
  • New Project, Who Dis? - Building SaaS #38

    In this episode, we started a brand new project! I had some internet troubles so this “stream” is actually a local recording from my computer. We created a new Django project from scratch and set up Heroku to handle deployments.

    In spite of the streaming trouble, we were able to get a bunch done. We started the project from scratch so we made a repository on GitHub with some .gitignore settings tailored for Python projects.

  • RunSnakeRun for Python3 Out

    So I finally pushed out the Python3/wxPython Pheonix compatible release of RunSnakeRun. The Python3 version has to run Python2 in order to load Python2 pstats dumps, and Meliae doesn't AFAIK support Python3 yet, so I expect I'll just drop support for it eventually. The code is now living on GitHub rather than Launchpad.

  • Angular 9 CRUD Tutorial: Consume a Python/Django CRUD REST API

    This tutorial is designed for developers that want to use Angular 9 to build front-end apps for their back-end REST APIs. You can either use Python & Django as the backend or use JSON-Server to mock the API if you don't want to deal with Python. We'll be showing both ways in this tutorial.

  • Django: Angular 9/8 Tutorial By Example: REST CRUD APIs & HTTP GET Requests with HttpClient

    In this Angular 9 tutorial, we'll learn to build an Angular 9 CRUD example application going through all the required steps from creating/simulating a REST API, scaffolding a new project, setting up the essential APIs, and finally building and deploying your final application to the cloud.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • sudo with TouchID and Apple Watch, even inside tmux

    Fast forward three years to today, and while griping to a friend about how it didn’t work inside tmux, I discovered that technology has advanced and there is now a fix, named pam_reattach! It’s a PAM module that you configure to run before the built-in pam_tid.so, and it makes the sudo command able to find and use the TouchID module to authenticate, even from inside tmux.

  • Excel spreasheet macro kicks off Formbook infection

    Formbook has been around for years. According to FireEye, Formbook has been "..advertised in various hacking forums since early 2016." My previous diary about Formbook was back in November 2019, and not much has changed since then. It still bears documentation, though, if only to show this malware is still active and remains part of our threat landscape.

  • Report: Most Popular Home Routers Have ‘Critical’ Flaws

    A new report reveals that common home routers from Netgear, Linksys, D-Link and other vendors contain serious security vulnerabilities that even updates don’t fix. While Linux can be a very secure OS in theory, researchers have found that many of these vulnerable routers are powered by very old versions of Linux that lack support and are riddled with security issues as a result.

  • Links: July 12, 2020

    The first story comes from Mexico, where apparently everything our community does will soon be illegal. We couch that statement because the analysis is based on Google translations of reports from Mexico, possibly masking the linguistic nuances that undergird legislative prose. So we did some digging and it indeed appears that the Mexican Senate approved a package of reforms to existing federal copyright laws that will make it illegal to do things like installing a non-OEM operating system on a PC, or to use non-branded ink cartridges in a printer. Reverse engineering ROMs will be right out too, making any meaningful security research illegal. There appear to be exceptions to the law, but those are mostly to the benefit of the Mexican government for “national security purposes.” It’ll be a sad day indeed for Mexican hackers if this law is passed. The other story comes from Germany, where a proposed law would grant sweeping surveillance powers to 19 state intelligence bodies. The law would require ISPs to install hardware in their data centers that would allow law enforcement to receive data and potentially modify it before sending it on to where it was supposed to go. So German Internet users can look forward to state-sponsored man-in-the-middle attacks and trojan injections if this thing passes.

My feature-rich and minimal Linux terminal

Everyone likes to set up their workspaces in a specific way; it helps your productivity and makes life easier to have things organized in a way that feels organic and to have an environment that feels good to you. That definitely applies to terminals too; that's probably why there are so many terminal options available. When starting on a new computer, the very first thing I do is set up my terminal to make it my own. My preferred terminal app is terminator because of its minimalist design and built-in windowing options. But it gets more complex from there. I would describe my preferred terminal style as "feature-rich yet, keeping it minimal." That balance is one I'm often fine-tuning. Read more

Programming: Data Science, David Pena and GSoC

Events and Community: LF, Kubernetes and LibreOffice

  • The Linux Foundation’s First-Ever Virtual Open Source Summit

    The success of The Linux Foundation‘s first virtual summit may well have set the standard for new levels of open source participation. Summit masters closed the virtual doors of the four-day joint gathering on July 2. The event hosted the Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference North America 2020 and ended with more than 4,000 registrants from 109 countries. The online attendance platform offered registrants a virtual experience that provided an immersive experience for event participants, according to The Linux Foundation (LF). That virtual attendance feeling was as close as possible to what they would have received at a face-to-face event, Kristin O’Connell, director of event marketing at The Linux Foundation, told LinuxInsider. One of the newcomers in technical trendsetting at this first virtual conference was the FinOps Foundation. The FinOps Foundation includes 1,500 individual members across the globe, representing more than 500 companies with more than US$1 billion in revenue each. In the same way that DevOps revolutionized development by breaking down silos and increasing agility, FinOps increases the business value of cloud by bringing together technology, business, and finance professionals with a new cultural set, knowledge skills and technical processes, LF maintained.

  • Kubernetes from cloud to edge: A US virtual event

    After the huge success of its latest virtual event on Kubernetes for the EMEA region, Canonical brings its expertise to the US with another educational discussion. On July 31st, Canonical’s panel of experts come together to share their insights from years of working with developers and enterprises on various Kubernetes use cases and interact with the audience live. For all the benefits it offers around container orchestration, Kubernetes remains a significantly complex platform to deploy and operate. As developers and enterprises alike turn to Kubernetes for more and more types of use cases, available Kubernetes solutions often fail to meet their exact needs. Canonical’s extensive Kubernetes portfolio is centered around Charmed Kubernetes and MicroK8s, designed to provide full flexibility from cloud to edge in order to facilitate efficient innovation and scaling.

  • Community Member Monday: Khairul Aizat Kamarudzzaman

    I’m from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I started exploring and using FOSS way back in 2004 (Debian, Red Hat, the BSD family and sticking with Ubuntu till today) when I was studying at the university. From there I started exploring and contributing to Ubuntu, which you can find here, and I was accepted to be an Ubuntu Member, Kubuntu Membes (merits as Ubuntu contributor). Finally I was appointed to be part of the Asia Oceania Membership Board. A a FOSS community member, I work in a few IT companies in Malaysia and was one of the engineers working at Open Source Competency Centre (OSCC) under Malaysian Administrative Modernisation and Management Planning Unit (MAMPU). Now I own my own IT company, namely Informology Sdn Bhd. Not stopping there, I continue actively being a FOSS enthusiast in Malaysia. When the cloud computing era came, I was involved by leading Malaysia OpenStack User Group, and I’ve recently been exploring and leading the Endless OS user group for Malaysia.