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elementary OS 5.1 Hera Released, This is What’s New

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This major update to elementary OS carries a wealth of changes and improvements, including native support for Flatpak, a faster App Centre store front, and many thoughtful refinements to the system’s bespoke UI.

A free update for existing elementary OS users, the Hera uplift also introduces Linux Kernel 5.0 courtesy of Ubuntu’s recent LTS hardware enablement stack update.

To learn more about what’s new in the elementary OS 5.1 release, and how to download it to try for yourself, keep reading!

elementary OS 5.1 Hera

The bulk of the changes being offered in the elementary OS 5.1 update aren’t strictly new as they’ve been iteratively pushed out via software updates to the elementary 5.0 Juno release.

But the sum total of those updates is enough to create a distinct, separate version number with new .iso images for folks to download. Think of it like an Ubuntu point release, in that sense.

Read more

Also: elementary OS 5.1 "Hera" Officially Released with Flatpak Support, New Greeter

elementary OS 5.1 Release Coverage by Brian Fagioli

  • elementary OS 5.1 'Hera' Linux distro is here

    elementary OS has long been viewed by many as the future of Linux on the PC thanks to its beautiful desktop environment and overall polished experience. Development of the Ubuntu-based operating system has been frustratingly slow, however. This shouldn't be surprising, really, as the team of developers is rather small, and its resources are likely much less than those of larger distributions such as the IBM-backed Fedora or Canonical's Ubuntu. And that is what makes elementary OS so remarkable -- its developers can make magic on a smaller budget.

    Today, the latest version of the operating system is released. Code-named "Hera," elementary OS 5.1 is now available for download. Support for Flatpak is now baked in — this is significant, as the developers explain it is “the first non-deb packaging format we've supported out of the box.” The Linux kernel now sits at a very modern 5.0. One of the most important aspects of elementary OS, the AppCenter, is now an insane 10 times faster than its predecessor. Wow.

Meet The Linux Desktop That’s More Elegant Than Mac And Windows

  • Meet The Linux Desktop That’s More Elegant Than Mac And Windows 10

    It’s no secret I have a distaste for Windows 10. Its telemetry, endless nagging, broken updates and general bloat pushed me to Linux last year. My opinion about macOS is less critical. I still utilize it for the occasional music production tasks, and it respects my privacy far better than Microsoft’s desktop OS. Unfortunately, the macOS experience hasn’t evolved much, and with each new update Apple continues its forced obsolescence of older hardware. But there’s a Linux alternative that exudes pure desktop elegance and runs like a dream on older machines. It emphasizes a clean workflow and thoughtful design in every single pixel. Yea, it’s time to pay attention to elementary OS.

    You’ve probably heard of Ubuntu, one of the most popular Linux distributions out there. Well, elementary OS is based on the stable version of Ubuntu (meaning you’ll get a thoroughly tested kernel and software) but it makes substantial tweaks to its presentation by using a custom Desktop Environment called Pantheon.

    At first blush, elementary OS (and by extension, the Pantheon desktop) may remind you of macOS — it may even comfortably feel like it — but when you start to dig in and use it, the differences become clear. It’s not only easier, but far more elegant.

    Today the developers behind elementary OS introduced version 5.1, which I’ve been testing for the last week. It brings several substantial improvements, and manages to outclass macOS (and every other Linux distribution available) in a few key areas.

Slashdot's mention

Introducing elementary OS 5.1 Hera

  • Introducing elementary OS 5.1 Hera

    Last October, we announced elementary OS 5 Juno with wide-ranging updates to provide a more refined user experience, improve productivity for new and seasoned users alike, and take our developer platform to the next level. Today we’re pleased to announce elementary OS 5.1 Hera, the latest major update.

elementary OS 5.1 Hera Released. Here’s What’s New

  • elementary OS 5.1 Hera Released. Here’s What’s New

    elementary announced the release of latest OS 5.1 – codenamed “Hera”. Read on to find out what’s in store.

    elementary OS is a “fast, open and privacy-respecting” Linux operating system developed by elementary, inc for non-technical and migrated users from MacOS/Windows. Based on Ubuntu and long term support releases, elementary is often cited as a nice looking operating system with handful set of curated apps developed specifically for you.

    Elementary – in a snapshot – comes with Pantheon desktop environment which is built upon GNOME, applications developed for different user purposes and easy to adopt for any users – be it new/migrated or advanced users.

The new elementary OS 5.1 Hera is a valuable addition

  • The new elementary OS 5.1 Hera is a valuable addition to the Linux landscape

    This week, on Tuesday December 3, 2019, Co-founder Cassidy James Blaede announced in an extensive blog that the 5.1 successor to the previous elementary OS Juno 5.0, which was already introduced more than a year ago, is immediately available for download. The new Linux distribution elementary OS 5.1 has been named Hera. Hera is a Greek goddess and also the wife of the God Zeus. This is nicely in line with Juno, which is the Latin name that the ancient Romans used for this same goddess Hera. Many of the improvements in Hera have, due to the somewhat rolling nature of elementary OS, been released to users in various interim updates in recent months. But this official new major update offers many more improvements in addition to these already released changes. In this blog post I will only give a global overview of what this release has to offer. When I have been able to work productively with this latest version for a while I will come back with a blog post with a more in depth and detailed description of everything that this distribution has to offer. So let’s see if the update to elementary OS 5.1 Hera is a valuable addition to the Linux landscape.

Elementary OS 5.1 Has Arrived

  • Elementary OS 5.1 Has Arrived

    One of the most highly regarded Linux desktop distributions has released its next iteration.

    If you’ve not heard of Elementary OS, chances are you don’t know what Linux is. If, on the other hand, you have heard of Elementary OS, and you’ve yet to give it a try, now’s a great time. Why? The latest release, 5.1 (aka “Hera”) is available and it promises to be the best release yet.

    Elementary 5.1 brings a number of new and exciting changes to what is often considered the most elegant desktop operating systems on the market.

elementary OS 5.1 Hera releases with Flatpak native support

  • elementary OS 5.1 Hera releases with Flatpak native support, several accessibility improvements, and more

    In elementary OS 5.1 Hera, the greeter and onboarding have seen major changes in order to give users an improved first-run experience. In addition to looking better, the redesigned greeter addresses some of the key reported issues including keyboard focus issues, HiDPI issues, and better localization. Hera also ships with a new Onboarding app that gives you a quick introduction to key features and also takes care of common first-run tasks like managing privacy settings.

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