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today's leftovers

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  • Analyzing MATE keyboard shortcuts

    Hello yet again! For those who are not acquainted with this series, I am in an endeavor to analyze keyboard shortcuts in most major DEs so that we, the KDE community, can decide on the best defaults for KDE Plasma. Last time I analyzed XFCE and before that, GNOME.

    This time we will also check on a non-keyboard-driven environment, MATE. I personally quite like MATE, mostly for two things: MATE Tweak’s ability to change panel layouts, and the Software Boutique, which looks as fashionable as its name.

    Preparations

    For testing MATE, I installed full ubuntu-mate-desktop on my work machine and used virtual machines containing Debian, Ubuntu MATE and Manjaro.

    This time, one of the candidates for the virtual machine was chosen based on a project currently being held at the public university I graduated in, namely the University of São Paulo, in São Paulo, Brazil. I chose Debian MATE in honor to the plans to migrate the computers at the computer section of FFLCH to Linux, the humanities school. Pragmatically speaking, Debian is also a good choice for usually keeping defaults as is for each desktop environment.

    For sources, I simply used MATE’s keyboard shortcuts application and its corresponding manual.

  • Calligra Plan version 3.2.1 released

    We are pleased to announce the release of Calligra Plan 3.2.1.

  • The Month in WordPress: November 2019

    November has been a big month in the WordPress community. New releases, big events, and a push for more contributors have characterized the work being done across the project — read on to find out more!

  • ryzen build (for openbsd)

    I like my computers fast and light, and thus the preference for Thinkpad X1 models and the like. But recently I’ve been playing more with my Samsung ultrabook and it’s definitely a step back in the performance department. But then I thought, what if we get a really fast desktop and remote into it? The classic solving a problem by turning it into two problems.

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  • Beware of shell globs

                         

                           

    Shell globs allow one to specify set of filenames with wildcard characters. This is really useful, but they have some rather unintuitive functions that could surprise you, and even cause big problems if you're unlucky enough.

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  • PeaZip 7.0

    PeaZip is an open source file and archive manager. It's freeware and free of charge for any use. PeaZip can extract most of archive formats both from Windows and Unix worlds, ranging from mainstream 7Z, RAR, TAR and ZIP to experimental ones like PAQ/LPAQ family, currently the most powerful compressor available.

  • OwnTracks on macOS

    So why did Christoph do this? Because he could! But honestly, since Catalyst isn’t 100% like programming for iOS, it has made OwnTracks better because several edge cases were detected and fixed.

  • Blue Beanie Day 2019

    Web designer Jeffrey Zeldman wrote a book about web standards and wears a blue beanie on the cover. This picture inspired the inventors of the Blue Beanie Day to choose a blue beanie as a sign of web accessibility. They now try to get everyone to take a selfie with a blue beanie and spread the word every year on November 30th. Who does not have blue beanie can also digitally paint or paste one into the picture.

    Web accessibility does not only affect people with disabilities. It is also important to provide [Internet] access to all people regardless of their technical capabilities. This includes, for example, the use of the [Internet] via text-only browsers. Also, age-related limitations as poor eyesight issues should be considered.

  • SPF-aware greylisting and filter-greylist

    TL;DR:
    - greylisting is a sound idea
    - yet it is not really practical today
    - people tend to disable it or find work-arounds
    - SPF-aware greylisting makes greylisting usable again

  • Slackware December Report

    It has been some time since i posted about Slackware updates and around 2.5 years since my wishlist i created in 2017. Only one item left that are still not yet approved by Patrick, but i have a hunch that it's coming soon to -Current tree. So i guess it's time to wrap some updates up to early December 2019:
    Linux LTS Kernel 5.4.x
    PHP 7.4.x
    GCC 9.2.x
    GLIBC 2.30
    Python 3.7.x
    Perl 5.30.x
    GTK+3 3.24.x
    NetworkManager 1.20.x
    vte 0.58.x
    XOrg 1.20.x
    tcl/tk 8.16.x
    Mesa 19.2.x
    Bind 9.14.x
    Rust 1.39.x
    SDL2.0.x
    Firefox 68.0-ESR
    Thunderbird 60.8.x
    MariaDB 10.4.x
    Postfix 3.4.x
    Samba 4.11.x
    OpenSSH 8.1p1

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (389-ds-base, asterisk, file, nss, proftpd-dfsg, ssvnc, and tnef), Fedora (chromium, djvulibre, freeradius, ImageMagick, jhead, kernel, phpMyAdmin, python-pillow, and rubygem-rmagick), Mageia (bzip2, chromium-browser-stable, curl, dbus, djvulibre, glib2.0, glibc, gnupg2, httpie, libreoffice, libssh2, mosquitto, nginx, python-sqlalchemy, unbound, and zipios++), openSUSE (bluez, clamav, cpio, freerdp, openafs, phpMyAdmin, strongswan, and webkit2gtk3), Red Hat (samba and SDL), Scientific Linux (389-ds-base), and SUSE (haproxy, python-Django, and tightvnc). 

  • TfL resets passwords for every Oyster account in London

    Cast your mind back to August - the weather was fairly lousy and TfL confirmed that around 1200 Oyster accounts had been [cracked].

    For the not-of-London, an Oyster card is London's joined-up RFID powered travel card - custodian of top-up fares and annual season tickets alike.

    Although that was a minor [attack] in relative terms, TfL has decided to take action to ensure that nothing like it happens again and has decided to reset everyone's passwords.

  • Linux 5.5 Seeing Some Wild Swings In Performance - Improvements But Also Regressions

    While there still is a week to go in the Linux 5.5 merge window with more feature code still landing, due to scheduler changes and other work already having landed, I already started running some Git benchmarks. Linux 5.5 at this stage appears quite volatile with some really nice improvements in some workloads but also regressions in others. 

    I started off some Linux 5.5 Git benchmarks a few days ago after seeing the scheduler changes land that are rather heavy this cycle and other work. Plus I wanted to test out some new features like the NVMe hwmon thermal reporting. 

More in Tux Machines

Nvidia Is Preparing An Unexpected Surprise For Linux Users In 2020

Each year Nvidia hosts the GPU Technology Conference, a global gathering of AI developers, data scientists, graphic artists, and pretty much anyone in the technology industry working with GPUs in their chosen fields. The event packs in keynotes with roadmaps and reveals, face-time with Nvidia engineers, and hundreds of sessions to participate in. GTC 2020, though, looks to include a special surprise for Linux users and open source enthusiasts. Supporting Nouveau eh? That’s the open source Linux driver used to drive Nvidia graphics cards (Nvidia also supplies a proprietary driver for Linux), and Nvidia’s historical lack of contributions is what led Linus Torvalds to famously flip Nvidia the bird and utter words I can’t print here. (I can link to them though. . .) The community of developers working on the Nouveau driver have experienced several roadblocks throughout the years. Paramount among them is the inability to achieve normal GPU clock speeds due to Nvidia’s locked down firmware on many models of graphics cards. This leads to undesirable performance and a multitude of potential video display issues across many Linux distributions. Read more

Android Leftovers

Pekwm: A lightweight Linux desktop

Let's say you want a lightweight desktop environment, with just enough to get graphics on the screen, move some windows around, and not much else. You find traditional desktops get in your way, with their notifications and taskbars and system trays. You want to live your life primarily from a terminal, but you also want the luxury of launching graphical applications. If that sounds like you, then Pekwm may be what you've been looking for all along. Pekwm is, presumably, inspired by the likes of Window Maker and Fluxbox. It provides an application menu, window decoration, and not a whole lot more. It's ideal for minimalists—users who want to conserve resources and users who prefer to work from a terminal. Read more

What motivates people to contribute to open source?

Knowing what motivates people is a smart way to recruit contributors to an open source project—and to keep them contributing once they've joined. For his book How Open Source Ate Software, Red Hat's Gordon Haff did a lot of research on the topic of motivation, and he shared some of it in his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2019, "Why do we contribute to open source?" Watch Gordon's Lightning Talk to learn about the three main types of motivation—extrinsic, intrinsic, and internalized extrinsic—what they are, and how they relate to open source communities. Read more