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  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Bob Belderbos

    This week we welcome Bob Belderbos (@bbelderbos) as our PyDev of the Week! Bob is a co-founder of PyBites. Bob has also contributed to Real Python and he’s a Talk Python trainer. You can learn more about Bob by checking out his website or visiting his Github profile. Let’s spend some quality time getting to know Bob better!

    Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

    I am a software developer currently working at Oracle in the Global Construction Engineering group. But I am probably better known as co-founder of PyBites, a community that masters Python through code challenges.

  • Spyder IDE: Variable Explorer improvements in Spyder 4

    Spyder 4 will be released very soon with lots of interesting new features that you'll want to check out, reflecting years of effort by the team to improve the user experience. In this post, we will be talking about the improvements made to the Variable Explorer.

    These include the brand new Object Explorer for inspecting arbitrary Python variables, full support for MultiIndex dataframes with multiple dimensions, and the ability to filter and search for variables by name and type, and much more.

    It is important to mention that several of the above improvements were made possible through integrating the work of two other projects. Code from gtabview was used to implement the multi-dimensional Pandas indexes, while objbrowser was the foundation of the new Object Explorer.

  • Django security releases issued: 2.2.8 and 2.1.15

    Since Django 2.1, a Django model admin displaying a parent model with related model inlines, where the user has view-only permissions to a parent model but edit permissions to the inline model, would display a read-only view of the parent model but editable forms for the inline.

    Submitting these forms would not allow direct edits to the parent model, but would trigger the parent model's save() method, and cause pre and post-save signal handlers to be invoked. This is a privilege escalation as a user who lacks permission to edit a model should not be able to trigger its save-related signals.

    To resolve this issue, the permission handling code of the Django admin interface has been changed. Now, if a user has only the "view" permission for a parent model, the entire displayed form will not be editable, even if the user has permission to edit models included in inlines.

    This is a backwards-incompatible change, and the Django security team is aware that some users of Django were depending on the ability to allow editing of inlines in the admin form of an otherwise view-only parent model.

  • Guidelines for BangPypers Dev Sprints

    How do you get started on open source programming? How can you contribute to that framework you’ve been itching to add an extra feature to? How do you get guidance and get help pushing your changes to merge upstream?

    If you’ve wondered on the above at least once, then you’re in dire need to attend one of our dev sprints.

  • Trey Hunner: Cyber Monday Python Sales

    Python Morsels is my weekly Python skill-building service.

    I’m offering something sort of like a “buy one get one free” sale this year.

    You can pay $200 to get 2 redemption codes, each worth 12 months of Python Morsels.

    You can use one code for yourself and give one to a friend. Or you could be extra generous and give them both away to two friends. Either way, 2 people are each getting one year’s worth of weekly Python training.

    You can find more details on this sale here.

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