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Games: Yogscast Jingle Jam, GCompris 0.97, Geneshift, RetroArch, Steam, Curious Expedition, Neon Noodles and Crusader Kings III

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Gaming
  • The Yogscast Jingle Jam bundle is back with 100% of the proceeds going to charity

    The Yogscast Jingle Jam, a bundle that Humble Bundle host each year is back with new games being added each day up until December 20 with 100% of the proceeds going to charity.

    Quite a different bundle to anything else they do, since it constantly adds new games and all the money goes to whatever charities have been selected. This year they include Wallace & Gromit's Grand Appeal, Stand Up to Cancer, Mental Health Foundation, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, War Child UK, Special Effect and more including our chosen charity The Free Software Foundation (FSF).

  • Release GCompris 0.97

    You can find packages of this new version for GNU/Linux, Windows and MacOS on the download page. This update will also be available soon in the Android Play store and the Windows store. For Raspberry Pi, we’ll provide an installer soon. The updated version for iOS is still not available. Note that the MacOS package is not yet notarized, we will look at doing this during next year.

    On the voices side, we added a new voice “try again” which is used in several activities instead of “check answer”. You can check on this page if this voice is available in your language: https://gcompris.net/voicestats/ (in the “Misc” section). You can help us by providing a nice recording of your voice for all the missing entries in your native language.

    On the translation side, we have 20 languages fully supported: Basque, Brazilian Portuguese, Breton, British English, Catalan, Chinese Traditional, Dutch, French, Galician, Greek, Italian, Macedonian, Malayalam, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Spanish, Swedish, Ukrainian.

    We also have 15 languages partially supported: Belarusian (65%), Catalan (Valencian 95%), Chinese Simplified (66%), Estonian (93%), Finnish (86%), German (96%), Hindi (73%), Hungarian (95%), Indonesian (95%), Irish Gaelic (78%), Norwegian Nynorsk (93%), Russian (76%), Scottish Gaelic (67%), Slovenian (54%), Turkish (95%).

  • Geneshift Battle Royale just got a lot prettier with a big update, also on sale right now

    Geneshift just keeps getting better! This indie action game that has a sweet fast-paced Battle Royale mode (along with a full single-player and co-op campaign) just had another rather huge update.

    For starters, it's had a bit of a graphical upgrade. It now has multisample anti-aliasing, upgraded player models that actually hold the weapons and an entirely new tilted camera angle. The new camera is a big improvement, giving you a proper sense of the height of objects around you, like getting some cover which the older top-down view just didn't give you.

  • RetroArch is getting hardware video decoding, manual content scanning and more

    The team behind the RetroArch front-end used with emulators, game engines and media players have announced that it will be getting proper hardware accelerated video decoding soon.

    Currently, all video decoding is done "entirely in software", so your CPU is doing the work instead of sending it off to your GPU which can cause slowdowns when your CPU is busy. They've said they're now going to be using FFmpeg supporting VDPAU and VAAPI. This might be good news for anyone using something like a Raspberry Pi, or other lower powered devices. You can see their full post on it here.

  • Steam Survey For November Points To Flat Linux Percentage

    With the start of a new month always comes the excitement of seeing what Valve's Steam Survey is pointing at for gaming trends as to the percentage of Linux gamers.

    For October 2019 the Linux gaming population on Steam according to Valve was about 0.83%, basically flat compared to September, at least on a percentage term. Meanwhile for the newly-published November figures it comes at 0.81%, or a decline of 0.02%.

  • Curious Expedition adds a RIVALS multiplayer mode with massive maps and it's great fun

    Curious Expedition, a roguelike expedition simulation game set in the late 19th century just recently had a big RIVALS update to add in multiplayer support. This isn't a DLC either, it's a full free update for everyone who owns the game which is fantastic.

    I'm quite a late arrival on this one, only picking it up in the sales recently and I ended up a little hooked on it so this was all rather good timing. The RIVALS mode is very similar to how it all works in single-player, with you each leading an expedition. You have to keep your people alive, deal with hostile wildlife and any random events as they pop up but all this is done across a map that's many times larger and you can see other expeditions roaming around which is quite odd.

  • Automate a futuristic food factory in Neon Noodles, out now in Early Access

    After a very promising early demo, Neon Noodles is out now in Early Access putting you in charge of automating food preparation. What could possibly go wrong?

    Directly inspired by similar such games from Zachtronics like Opus Magnum and Infinifactory, you're in charge of designing and building a fully automated kitchen. No programming needed, as it's all using simple blocks and commands. It's a lot more interesting than it sounds that's for sure!

  • Paradox give a little insight into murder and seduction in Crusader Kings 3's new Scheme system

    Crusader Kings III will allow you to run various secret schemes with a brand new system. Not just giving you the ability to take out a rival but perhaps sway someone over to your side too.

    In the latest developer diary, they talk about wanting a system like the Murder Plot from CKII but have it "slightly easier to predict while keeping it unreliable in its outcome" so that murder is still an option but not quite as safe as before. It also sounds like it's been both expanded and streamlined at the same time, to give you more options for scheming while also needing to send out less agents.

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