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DPL Sam Hartman: Voting Guide for Debian Init Systems GR

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Debian

So, under this proposal, a maintainer must integrate support for running
without systemd if it is available. They are responsible for going out
and finding this support. If the support is as simple as writing an
init script, the maintainer has an RC bug until they write the init
script. If the support is more complex, the maintainer is not
responsible for writing it. Proposal A is the same as Proposal E,
except that the bug is not release-critical. I'll go into Proposal A in
more detail after discussing Proposal D.



Proposal D is similar to Proposal E. My interpretation is that Proposal D places
somewhat less of a burden on maintainers to go out and find existing
non-systemd support. My interpretation is that the bug becomes RC when
someone contributes that support. (Or if the support is present in the
upstream but turned off in the package). Proposal D requires that
non-systemd support not have a substantial effect on systemd
installations. So where as Proposal E uses the designed exclusively for
systemd criteria, Proposal D uses the no substantial effect on systemd
systems criteria to determine whether working only with systemd is
acceptable. The discussions seemed to imply that if Gnome uses systemd
features in excess of what technologies like elogind can handle, it is
likely to meet both criteria.



Proposal D goes into a lot more detail than Proposal E. Proposal E
would likely be a long-term block on using systemd facilities like
sysusers. Proposal D specifically proposes a mechanism whereby such
facilities can be documented in policy. This mechanism is only
available if it is likely that developers of non-systemd (including
non-Linux) systems will implement the facility. After a six-to-twelve
month transition time, the facility can be used even on non-systemd
systems. So, sufficiently low effort in the non-systemd community that
it is unreasonable to expect a facility could be implemented could still
permanently block adoption of such facilities. Proposal D is definitely
about a long-term commitment to non-systemd systems even if the effort
in the non-systemd community is not as high as we'd like to adopt new
features elsewhere.



Proposal D also includes a number of guidelines for proper behavior
around these emotionally charged issues.

Read more

Also: Debian-Med Bug Squashing

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