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Canonical Teases Big Ubuntu Announcement with Leading Global Automation Company

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Ubuntu

Canonical, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, announced today that it will be present at the upcoming Smart Product Solutions (SPS) 2019 event in Nuremberg to showcase Ubuntu Core to the industrial Mittelstand.

Canonical continues to promote its Ubuntu Core operating system, a slimmed-down version of Ubuntu designed and optimized to run on smaller, embedded hardware, such as IoT (Internet of Things) devices, and it now promises to support the Mittelstand innovators, which are medium-sized companies, with Open Source software and GNU/Linux technologies.

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  • Canonical introduces Ubuntu to the industrial Mittelstand at SPS 2019

    Canonical is attending the Smart Product Solutions (SPS) trade fair in Nuremberg from November 26th to 28th. We are convening to the 30th edition of the trade fair for smart automation solutions alongside 1650 other exhibitors. Digital transformation in automation will be the main theme of SPS 2019, under the official motto “automation meets IT”. Find us at booth 119 in hall 6.

    Mittelstand companies attending SPS are the backbone of industry. However, these companies have seen their growth challenged by global competition from emerging economies. But today, the industry 4.0 revolution offers an opportunity for Mittelstand companies to differentiate by innovating.

    We at Canonical, are on a mission to empower innovators with open-source software. We endeavor to be a technology partner of big corporations as well as SMEs, in their journey to industry 4.0 transformation. For this purpose, we have made the latest and greatest embedded and IoT technologies ready for deployment by Mittelstand innovators.

  • Streaming Television -- A New Hope?

    There is a somewhat cheeky interactive posted by The New York Times to help people determine what services they should subscribe to in streaming. As you might imagine, it is a newspaper based in the United States of America so the results of the quiz are biased to here. Caveat lector.

    There has been chatter in the Ubuntu Podcast Telegram group about the usability of such streaming services. There hasn’t been discussion on the podcast yet but you are encouraged to tune in via Spotify, via iTunes, or on Android.

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