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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Celebrating KEDA 1.0: Providing an event-driven scale capability for any container workload [Ed: Red Hat works with and for Microsoft, even gives Microsoft all the code]

    Today the community celebrates KEDA 1.0, an open source project aimed at providing event-driven scale capabilities for container workloads. Introduced earlier this year, Red Hat is contributing to KEDA both via the upstream project and by bringing its utility to customers using enterprise Kubernetes and containers with Red Hat OpenShift. We celebrate this milestone with Microsoft and the wider community.

  • We're all on a journey to cloud-native adoption together

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is hosting its core conference for the fifth year running. It’s official title is KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, but it’s most importantly the home for Kubernetes. Adopters, contributors, and Kubernetes-curious attendees add up to a record-breaking 12,000 people.

    I attended to cover the show for our community (full disclosure: my ticket was provided as an industry analyst). Here’s what I heard on day 1.

  • Container reality checks and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

    [...]

    The impact: Another container reality check that also drives home why going through the trouble of standards can be worth it in the long run.

Red Hat and Microsoft debut KEDA 1.0

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, OpenRA and Lutris

  • Steam and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive once again smash user records

    What seems to be a regular occurrence now during the COVID-19 outbreak, both Steam and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive have yet again broken their own concurrent user records.

  • A new OpenRA test build is up for classic RTS action, with more single-player mission support

    The incredible people hacking away on OpenRA have a new test build up to provide a better experience playing Command & Conquer, Red Alert and Dune 2000 on modern systems. Building on top of the massive test build earlier this month that added in some major new rendering features like zooming found in other RTS games, this is focused on some final touches and will hopefully be the last test build before a new stable release. For Tiberian Dawn (the original C&C) they've added in the GDI 08a and 09 mission support, along with a couple bug fixes. For Dune 2000 the Ordos 6a mission is now supported, plus they fixed spiceblooms not spawning when the overlaying spice was removed. Red Alert should be smoother now too as minelayers should no longer leak enemy mine positions through the fog, plus there's numerous balance changes.

  • Game manager 'Lutris' has a new release with initial Humble Bundle and VKD3D support

    Lutris, the excellent free and open source game manager for Linux has a fresh release up with some brand new and big features that made it in. One of the headline additions is Humble Bundle support, allowing you to login to your Humble Store account and download any of the DRM-free release you own from their store making managing those less annoying. A wonderful addition! Speaking on Twitter, they mentioned that more work needs to be done to match up all the games from Humble to those in their database so it's ongoing and support will continue to improve.

Android Leftovers

Android Leftovers

Systemd-Free antiX 19.2 Released with Latest Debian Buster Updates

Coming three months after the first point release, antiX 19.2 is here to provide the community with an up-to-date installation media for new deployments, but also to add some extra features. One of these extra features is support for the runit init system, a UNIX init scheme with service supervision, which was bacakported from Debian Sid (Unstable). If you want to install antiX with the runit init system, you must download special ISO images that are only made for 32-bit systems. The rest of the ISOs are using the sysvinit init system. Read more