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Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

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Linux
  • Linux's Crypto API Is Adopting Some Aspects Of Zinc, Opening Door To Mainline WireGuard

    Mainlining of the WireGuard secure VPN tunnel was being held up by its use of the new "Zinc" crypto API developed in conjunction with this network tech. But with obstacles in getting Zinc merged, WireGuard was going to be resorting to targeting the existing kernel crypto interfaces. Instead, however, it turns out the upstream Linux crypto developers were interested and willing to incorporate some elements of Zinc into the existing kernel crypto implementation.

    Back in September is when Jason Donenfeld decided porting WireGuard to the existing Linux crypto API was the best path forward for getting this secure networking functionality into the mainline kernel in a timely manner. But since then other upstream kernel developers working on the crypto subsystem ended up with patches incorporating some elements of Zinc's design.

  • zswap: use B-tree for search
    The current zswap implementation uses red-black trees to store
    entries and to perform lookups. Although this algorithm obviously
    has complexity of O(log N) it still takes a while to complete
    lookup (or, even more for replacement) of an entry, when the amount
    of entries is huge (100K+).
    
    B-trees are known to handle such cases more efficiently (i. e. also
    with O(log N) complexity but with way lower coefficient) so trying
    zswap with B-trees was worth a shot.
    
    The implementation of B-trees that is currently present in Linux
    kernel isn't really doing things in the best possible way (i. e. it
    has recursion) but the testing I've run still shows a very
    significant performance increase.
    
    The usage pattern of B-tree here is not exactly following the
    guidelines but it is due to the fact that pgoff_t may be both 32
    and 64 bits long.
    
    
  • Zswap Could See Better Performance Thanks To A B-Tree Search Implementation

    For those using Zswap as a compressed RAM cache for swapping on Linux systems, the performance could soon see a measurable improvement.

    Developer Vitaly Wool has posted a patch that switches the Zswap code from using red-black trees to a B-tree for searching. Particularly for when having to search a large number of entries, the B-trees implementation should do so much more efficiently.

  • AT&T Finally Opens Up dNOS "DANOS" Network Operating System Code

    One and a half years late, the "DANOS" (known formerly as "dNOS") network operating system is now open-source under the Linux Foundation.

    AT&T and the Linux Foundation originally announced their plan in early 2018 wish pushing for this network operating system to be used on more mobile infrastructure. At the time they expected it to happen in H2'2018, but finally on 15 November 2019 the goal came to fruition.