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Geforce 7800 to arrive in eight days

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Hardware

I MADE a nasty little typo calling G70 the Geforce 7800GFX, not the GTX but it won't change the realité that much. My sincere apologies but that what happens if you write much on the plane.

We saw at more than one place that Nvidia is planning to introduce this card in eight days from press time, Sunday late night Greenwich Mean Time. You do the maths.

Advertisements are all over the web including the INQUIRER's front page where one of the ads is suggesting "to prepare yourself for the ultimate graphics experience coming in eight days". Some computer shops are also running this advert and have the 7800 category waiting for Nvidia's announcement.

Some knowledgeable people said that the memory clock speed will end up at 1200MHz and even some documents seen by the INQ stated 1400MHz memory clock. Nvidia confuzzled everyone's game.

This card will, without a doubt, be the fastest card introduced and will beat 6800 Ultra by a nice margin and in some tests and settings will end up significantly faster.

It seems that like AMD, Nvidia likes Tuesdays and all suggests that both companies are going to introduce their products on that day, AMD, its new 2800MHz clocked FX-57, and Nvidia its G70, Geforce 7800 GTX.

Still there might be one faster card from Nvidia coming in the near future as the Ultra suffix remains unused. This summer will be full of dirty little graphic games from both ATI and Nvidia. Stay tuned to watch the Schadenfreude. µ

Source.

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