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Browse Faster With Brave! The First Stable Release is Here

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Brave browser is an interesting take as a privacy-focused browser. Even though we already have plenty of options to consider for Linux (Chromium/Firefox, etc.), the Brave browser stands out for things like strictly blocking ads and trackers.

It was in the beta phase before the announcement. So, if you already had it installed, you may not find a significant change with this release.

If you are learning about this browser for the first time, I shall mention a few key highlights associated with this release.

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Also: Brave Launches Next-Generation Browser that Puts Users in Charge of Their Internet Experience with Unmatched Privacy and Rewards

Brave Browser Reaches Version 1.0

  • Brave Browser Reaches Version 1.0

    The Brave browser was pioneered by Mozilla co-founder and JavaScript inventor Brendan Eich and we originally reported on it in January 2016 when it was at version 0.7. Now as it launches Version 1.0, the Brave browser already has 8.7 million monthly active users across the globe

    Motivated by dissatisfaction with "maladvertising", Brave promises to prioritize security by blocking third-party ads, trackers, and won't allow video to autoplay. This makes it faster and saves users' time and battery life.

    Announcing the official launch of Brave 1.0 the blog post states:

    The Brave open source browser fundamentally shifts how users, publishers, and advertisers interact online by giving users a private, safer, and 3-6x faster browsing experience, while funding the Web through a new attention-based platform of privacy-preserving advertisements and rewards.

    The numbers displayed at the top of this screen reveal that Brave has blocked 117,674 ads and trackers, saved 2,846 upgrades, thus saving an estimated 59 minutes in the current brower session.

The Inquirer

  • Brave 1.0 is ready for privacy-loving web surfers

    The browser promises to not only block adverts and trackers but to also offer Brave Ads, which are a form of adverts that will pay people to view them and not gobble their data. Such ads are delivered through push notifications rather than intrusive web page banner ads.

    It's a somewhat novel approach and one that will see targeted ads that won't spill data out of the browser's hands and into the grubby mitts of third parties.

    Folks who opt into Brave Ads will get blockchain tokens as a reward. These can be cashed in for vouchers or gift cards through Brave's partner Upload, or they can be given to an article's writer or website creator.

Brave Browser 1.0 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu 18.04

Brave browser hits 1.0 with crypto-coin rewards

    • Like a BAT outta hell, Brave browser hits 1.0 with crypto-coin rewards for your fave websites

      The privacy-focused Brave web browser has reached version 1.0, available now for Windows, macOS, Linux, iOS and Android.

      Brave, an open-source browser based on the Google Chromium project, is notable for two things. First, it blocks ads, trackers and cross-site cookies by default. This feature is called Shields. An icon in the toolbar tells you how many items are blocked, with numbers in the 30s and 40s common.

      If the site is either well-behaved and you want to allow ads to be displayed, or so badly behaved that it does not work with Shields on (and you are desperate to see the content), you can disable Shields for a site by clicking the icon.

      The second feature is more radical, and aims to provide an alternative way of funding web publishers via the BAT (Basic Attention Token) cryptocurrency. Users can opt-in to Brave Rewards, which means they see ads in the browser (by default 2 per hour), published by Brave rather than by the sites you visit, for which they earn BATs. You can spend BATs by donating to websites that you like (currently around 300,000 are registered), via an auto-contribute feature, or use them as you wish. BAT is built on the Ethereum platform, and a token currently trades for around $0.25.

Brave 1.0 launches, bringing the privacy-first browser

  • Brave 1.0 launches, bringing the privacy-first browser out of beta

    Today marks the official launch of Brave 1.0, a free open-source browser. The beta version has already drawn 8 million monthly users, but now, the full stable release is available for Windows, macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS.

    Brave promises to prioritize security by blocking third-party ads, trackers, and autoplay videos automatically. So you don’t need to go into your settings to ensure greater privacy, though you can adjust those settings if you want to.

    Several browsers have taken steps to block trackers and ads, but in many cases, they’re limited or need to be enabled. Firefox started blocking some trackers by default earlier this year. Safari goes a step further by blocking almost all third-party trackers from sites you don’t visit frequently while allowing trackers from sites you check regularly but limiting their duration to 24 hours.

    Microsoft Edge is still testing a feature that also only blocks some trackers by default, which should arrive on January 15th. Google announced in May that it plans to launch some tracker-blocking tools, but doesn’t plan to block cookies on a large scale and hasn’t rolled out those tools quite yet; instead, the company has said it’s expecting to deliver a way to block certain “classifications” of cookies in Chrome by default in February 2020.

‘Privacy first’ Brave browser exits beta

  • ‘Privacy first’ Brave browser exits beta

    Brave Software has launched Brave 1.0, the official GA release of its controversial, privacy-focused web browser.

    The open source browser combines a blockchain-based digital advertising and payments platform and “privacy by design,” combatting “surveillance capitalism” by blocking trackers, invasive ads, and device fingerprinting. This improves speed, privacy, security, and performance, the company said.

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