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OpenSUSE Project Name Change Vote - Results

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SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Project Name Change Vote - Results
    Dear all,
    
    The vote has ended and the results have been released.
    
      Do we change the project name?
    
      Yes    42
      No    225
    
    Regards,
    
    Ish Sookun
    
  • openSUSE votes not to change its name

    The openSUSE project has been considering a name change as part of its move into a separate foundation since (at least) June. A long and somewhat controversial vote of project members has just come to an end, and the result is conclusive: 225-42 against the name change.

How many openSUSE fans want a name change? The answer is 42

  • How many openSUSE fans want a name change? The answer is 42…and it’s not enough

    openSUSE fans can rest easy that their lovingly curated swag remains relevant, after the community behind the Linux distribution voted against a proposal to change the project’s name.

    Community leaders had turned to the people – or at least interested members of the openSUSE community – following debate on whether the project should reconstitute itself as a new legal entity, such as a community.

    This had unsurprisingly led to discussion over the openSUSE name and trademarks – SUSE and the SUSE logo are trademarks of SUSE LLC, the commercial company that champions the project and its open source operating system.

    So, a straightforward proposal was put to the community: Do we change the project name?

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