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Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: GhostBSD 19.09, BSD Now and Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

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  • GhostBSD 19.09 – Based on FreeBSD 12.0-STABLE and Using MATE Desktop 1.22

    GhostBSD 19.09 is the latest release of GhostBSD. This release based on FreeBSD 12.0-STABLE while also pulling in TrueOS packages, GhostBSD 19.09 also has an updated OpenRC init system, a lot of unnecessary software was removed, AMDGPU and Radeon KMS is now valid xconfig options and a variety of other improvements and fixes.

    GhostBSD 19.09 continues using the MATE desktop 1.22 by default, but also providing a community Xfce desktop image. GhostBSD 19.09 switches to LightDM as its display/log-in manager, supports ZFS now when using the MBR mode in the installer, drops gksu, and has a number of bug fixes especially to its installer among other packages.

  • OSI Burrito Guy | BSD Now 323

    The earliest Unix code, how to replace fail2ban with blacklistd, OpenBSD crossed 400k commits, how to install Bolt CMS on FreeBSD, optimized hammer2, appeasing the OSI 7-layer burrito guys, and more.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E31 – Ikari Warriors

    This week we’ve been moonlighting on all the podcasts and live streaming to share Ubuntu bug reporting skills. We discuss Ubuntu on Raspberry Pi 4, Debian’s new homepage, elementary updates and Fedora 31. We also round up some events and our picks from the tech news.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 31 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

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Yes, there's a lot of talk now about how quantum computers can do jobs in 200 seconds that would take the world's fastest supercomputers 10,000 years. That's nice. But the simple truth is, for almost all jobs, supercomputers are faster than anything else on the planet. And, in the latest Top 500 supercomputer ratings, the average speed of these Linux-powered racers is now an astonishing 1.14 petaflops. The fastest of the fast machines haven't changed since the June 2019 Top 500 supercomputer list. Leading the way is Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Summit system, which holds top honors with an HPL result of 148.6 petaflops. This is an IBM-built supercomputer using Power9 CPUs and NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs. Read more