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today's leftovers

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  • Ismael Olea: Congress/Conference organization tasks list draft

    Well, when checking my blog looking for references about resources related with conferences organization I’ve found I had any link to this thing I compiled two years ago (!!??). So this post is fixing it.

    After organizing a couple national and international conferences I compiled a set of tasks useful as an skeleton for you next conference. The list is not absolutely exhaustive neither strictly formal but it’s complete enough to be, I think, accurate and useful. In its current this task list is published at tree.taiga.io as Congress/Conference organization draft: «a simplified skeleton of a kanban project for the organization of conferences. It’s is specialized in technical and opensource activities based in real experience».

  • YABA is a Backplane Architecture Controller for Automation and IIoT (Crowdfunding)
  • DepthAI Brings AI plus Depth to the Raspberry Pi (Crowdfunding)

    Edge computing on the Raspberry PI has been a bit of ups and downs, especially with everyone gearing for AI in everything. 

  • This open-source AI tool quickly isolates the vocals in any song

    The software is called Spleeter and was developed by music streaming service Deezer for research purposes. Yesterday the company released it as an open-source package, putting the code up on Github for anyone to download and use. Just feed Spleeter an audio file and it spleets splits it into two, four, or five separate audio tracks known as stems. The results aren?t perfect but they are eminently usable and Spleeter itself is very fast. When running on a dedicated GPU it can split audio files into four stems 100 times faster than real time.

  • New LibreOffice packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current

    I uploaded the latest releases of LibreOffice for Slackware 14.2 and -current.

    On Slackware 14.2 you can enjoy the stable 6.2.8 version, this is the last release in the 6.2 series. For Slackware-current I went with the latest and greatest ‘fresh’ release of 6.3.3 which became available last week.

    Note that the packages for LibreOffice in my repository, do contain “libreoffice-kde-integration” for Slackware -current, containing Qt5 and KDE5 (aka Plasma5) support. On the other hand, packages for Slackware 14.2 do not contain “libreoffice-kde-integration” any longer.
    If you run Slackware-current but do not have KDE5 packages installed at all, don’t worry. LibreOffice will work great – the KDE integration package just will not add anything useful for you. On the other hand, if you have Plasma5 installed you will benefit from native file selection dialog windows and other integration features. And even if you do not have Plasma5 but you do have Qt5 installed, then you will be able to run LibreOffice with Qt5 User Interface elements instead of defaulting to GTK3.

  • This Week in Rust 311

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Nolan Lawson shares what he has learned about accessibility

    Over the past year and a half, I have ventured time and again into the federated Mastodon social network. In those ventures, I have contributed bug reports to both the Mastodon client as well as some alternative clients on the web, iOS, and Android.

    One of those clients, a single-page, progressive web app, is Pinafore by Nolan Lawson. He had set out to create a fast, light-weight, and accessible, client from the ground up. When I started to use Pinafore, I immediately noticed that a lot of thought and effort had already gone into the client and I could immediately start using it.

  • Stop using ridiculously low DNS TTLs

                         

                           

    Of course, a service can switch to a new cloud provider, a new server, a new network, requiring clients to use up-to-date DNS records. And having reasonably low TTLs helps make the transition friction-free. However, no one moving to a new infrastructure is going to expect clients to use the new DNS records within 1 minute, 5 minutes or 15 minutes. Setting a minimum TTL of 40 minutes instead of 5 minutes is not going to prevent users from accessing the service.

                           

    However, it will drastically reduce latency, and improve privacy and reliability by avoid unneeded queries.

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  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • What are DDoS Attacks and How to Guard Against Them
  • Netflix Open Sources Polynote
  • WordPress 5.3 RC4

    The fourth release candidate for WordPress 5.3 is now available!

    WordPress 5.3 is currently scheduled to be released on November 12 2019, but we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.3 yet, now is the time!

  • Is Difficult to Switch Operating System From Windows to Linux?

    I got this question on one of the Q&A sites. On the site, I also respond to this question that was asked of me. This time I want to discuss it in this post. So how do I respond to this question?

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Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Email – Week 5

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of single-board computers. Last week’s blog looked at whether the RPI4 cuts the mustard as a desktop web browser. It does although with a few reservations. This week’s blog focuses on another absolutely essential desktop activity. Managing your email. My email requirements are very simple. I use Gmail for my personal email. It offers ample storage, threads, rich text features, useful keyboard shortcuts, and more. It gives me access to my email whatever device and platform I’m using. For the RPI4 to replace my desktop, I need quick and easy access to Gmail. Read more