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Sailfish OS Torronsuo is now available

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Gadgets

Sailfish OS 3.2.0 Torronsuo is a substantial release introducing updated hardware adaptation support, which enables us to bring Sailfish X to newer generation devices like the Sony Xperia 10. The Xperia 10 is also the first device to come with user data encryption enabled by default, and with SELinux, Security-Enhanced Linux, access control framework enabled. We’ll be rolling out SELinux policies in phases. For now Torronsuo introduces SELinux policies for display control (MCE), device startup and background services (systemd), and more will follow in upcoming releases. We have a few details of the Xperia 10 support to finalise, and will announce Sailfish X for the Sony Xperia 10 within the upcoming weeks.

Torronsuo National Park is in the Tavastia Proper region of Finland. This park is valuable for its birdlife and butterfly species. Roughly a hundred species nest in the area. Part of the birds and insects are species that typically live in the northern areas, and they aren’t seen much elsewhere in southern Finland.

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Sailfish OS 3.2 Released With Better Hardware Adaptation Support

  • Sailfish OS 3.2 Released With Better Hardware Adaptation Support

    Jolla has outed Sailfish OS "Torronsuo" or more easily known as the version 3.2 update for this mobile Linux-based largely proprietary operating system.

    Sailfish OS 3.2 does come with updated hardware support, which now allows for Jolla's mobile OS to run on the likes of the Sony Xperia 10.

    Sailfish OS 3.2 also features improvements to the calling experience, a better onboarding experience with different usability enhancements, a much better "Clock" application, less frequent battery notifications, better WLAN/WiFi editing, better Twitter support within the Sailfish Browser, and many other changes.

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mesa 19.2.4

Hi list,

I'd like to announce mesa-19.2.4, which is available immediately. This is an
emergency release, to fix a critical bug found in the 19.2.3 release which
causes incomplete rendering on all mesa drivers. This release contains a single
patch to fix that bug, anyone using 19.2.3 should immediately upgrade to 19.2.4
or downgrade to 19.2.2.

Dylan
Read more Also: Mesa 19.2.4 Released As Emergency Update After 19.2.3 Broke All OpenGL Drivers