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PCLinuxOS Articles of Interest

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PCLOS
  • Mind Your Step, Part 3

    On September 30th, Forever 21 filed bankruptcy and subsequently, all of its stores closed down. GameStop is predicted to be the next retailer to go.

    GameStop started out as Electronics Boutique back in the 1990s, which was itself spun off from Waldenbooks, of which it, competitor Borders and Builder's Square were purchased by K-Mart Corporation (pre-Sears)...and we all know what happened there. GameStop was spared its demise since it was spun off from Waldenbooks.

    I remember Electronics Boutique well, because not only did it sell video games and gaming consoles, but it also sold PC software. It is there where I purchased copies of Lotus Improv, Turbo Pascal for Windows and Turbo C++ for Windows. (I was running OS/2 at that time.)

    GameStop is still a functioning retailer, but for how long? Last time I was in a GameStop, they sold the major consoles and all the popular games. For a while, they were selling second hand iPhones and Android powered smartphones. Other than that, there is a 50/50 mix of new and used gaming hardware and software, including some PC-based titles that could run on Wine.

    At times, I would find a MS-DOS based title now and then, but even that is becoming a rarity. (A better source for MS-DOS titles would be a thrift store such as Goodwill.)

    What could ultimately kill GameStop would be the next generation of gaming consoles, which would require a high speed internet connection to function as all games would be online games (i.e. no CD/DVD/Blu-Ray discs needed). The currently available Sony PlayStation 4 largely depends on the Internet to function.

  • De-Googling Yourself

    Last month, we paused this series of articles to address Richard Stallman's departure from the FSF presidency. Now let's get back to our subject, which is to introduce alternative services to Google's.

  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: rolgiati

    Why and when did you start using Linux?

    When: In the days when Slackware became available on the Walnut Creek CDROM (and not a stack of 20-odd 3.5" floppies). It must have been 1993 or 1994, when one had to buy Mosaic to surf the web, because there were no free browsers then

    Why: In four words "Blue Screen Of Death". Got fed up with the inadequacy of MS Windows, read about Linux, got the Slackware CD and was hooked. Later, I moved to Mandrake/Mandriva/Mageia, flirted with Debian (then Devuan when the Poettering Plague started spreading), and finally PCLOS where I rejoiced in finding again all the Drak/Drax tools I had been sorely missing in Debian/Devuan.

  • Screenshot Showcase
  • Special Drivers In PCLinuxOS, Part 1
  • Texstar Taking Care Of Business

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Proprietary Software From OnlyOffice and Microsoft

  • OnlyOffice, the Open Source Office Suite Apis Now Available on Flathub

    Big fan of productivity software? If so, you may be interested to know that the OnlyOffice Desktop Editors are now available on Flathub. Yes, Flathub, aka the de facto app store for Flatpak, the cross-distro containerised app distribution method.

  • ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors Now Available To Install On Linux From Flathub

    ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors, a free and open source office suite that offers text, spreadsheet and presentation editors for the Linux, Windows and macOS desktops, is now available on Flathub for easy installation (and update) on Linux distributions that support Flatpak. Flathub is an app store and build service for Linux that distributes applications as Flatpak packages, which allows them to run on almost any Linux distribution. ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors allows creating, viewing and editing text documents, spreadsheets and presentations with support for most popular formats like .docx, .odt, .xlsx., .ods, .pptx, .csv and .odp. Its website claims it has the "highest compatibility with Microsoft Office formats".

  • How to get Microsoft core fonts on Linux

    Linux is an open-source operating system. As a result, it is missing some critical components that users of proprietary operating systems enjoy. One big thing that all Linux operating systems miss out on is proprietary fonts. The most used proprietary fonts out there today are the Microsoft Core Fonts. They’re used in many apps, development, and even graphics design projects. In this guide, we’ll go over how to set them up on Linux. Note: not using Ubuntu, Debian, Arch Linux, Fedora, or OpenSUSE? Download the generic font package here and install the fonts by hand.

IEI's and Arbor Technology's Linux-Ready Devices

  • IEI ITG-100AI DIN-Rail Rugged mini PC Comes with a Myriad X AI Accelerator Module
  • Compact Kaby Lake signage player has dual 4K HDMI ports

    Arbor’s rugged, Linux-friendly “IEC-3900” signage player has a 7th Gen U-Series Core CPU, dual independent 4K HDMI ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, M.2 SATA storage, and a 130 x 124 x 35mm footprint. Arbor Technology, which recently introduced a rugged ELIT-1930 signage player based on Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake, has now launched an even more rugged signage system with a much more compact form factor that runs on a 7th Gen Kaby Lake processor. The 130 x 124 x 35mm, 0.73 kg IEC-3900 runs Linux or Win 10 on a dual-core, 2.8GHz/3.9GHz Core i7-7600U or 2.6GHz/3.5GHz Core i5-7300U.

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