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Pinebook and PinePhone Preorders

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  • The Second Window of the Pinebook Pro Pre-Order has been Announced

    The Pinebook Pro is not like other computer manufacturers, they are not stacked in a warehouse for regular sale.

    They are produced in batches based on sales. So don’t miss the sale if you really want to buy it.

    The Pinebook Pro costs $199.99 with additional shipping charges.

    The pre-orders are estimated dispatch in December 2019.

    In some bad cases, don’t worry if you missed it or sold it, the next pre-order window will be available in early 2020.

  • PinePhone “Brave Heart Edition” pre-orders open Nov 15th (Cheap Linux smartphone)

    The PinePhone is a $149 smartphone designed to run free and open source operating systems such as PostmarketOS, Ubuntu Touch, KDE Plasma Mobile, LuneOS, or Sailfish OS.

    First unveiled in January, the PinePhone has been under development ever since — and the first pre-production phones were supposed to ship to developers in September.

    After encountering several delays, Pine64 says those developer phones are going to start shipping this week — and on November 15th the company will begin taking pre-orders for the first PinePhone 64 Brave Heart Edition smartphones, which are set to ship in December.

PinePhone Linux smartphone pre-orders start next week

  • PinePhone Linux smartphone pre-orders start next week

    Linux users keeping tabs on the smartphone market may have long been wishing for an honest to goodness non-Android Linux phone. That almost came to be with Ubuntu Touch but Canonical sadly saw no profit to be made there. That mission has then been left to smaller companies that prize principles over profits, manufacturing and selling computing devices that value security and privacy more than anything else. One of those is PINE64 whose PinePhone is just a month away from becoming reality.

Budget-friendly Linux Smartphone PinePhone

  • Budget-friendly Linux Smartphone PinePhone Will be Available to Pre-order Next Week

    Do you remember when It’s FOSS first broke the story that Pine64 was working on a Linux-based smartphone running KDE Plasma (among other distributions) in 2017? It’s been some time since then but the good news is that PinePhone will be available for pre-order from 15th November.

    Let me provide you more details on the PinePhone like its specification, pricing and release date.

PinePhone with Linux OS up for pre-order next week

  • PinePhone with Linux OS up for pre-order next week

    Pine64 is best known as maker of the US$99 Pinebook laptop, a low-cost, low-power device running Linux. The company announced late last year that it was commencing work on a low-cost, low-power smartphone also running Linux. Now, slightly over 12 months later, the PinePhone is on the verge of becoming a reality with pre-orders of the PinePhone Brave Heart Edition starting November 15. Targeting early adopters, the model will start reaching customers in late December through early January.

    The company’s latest blog post reveals that it hasn’t all been smooth sailing to date but boiled down to the fact that it wasn’t able to reliably source quality digitizers but that it now has its supply chain issues sorted. Although the company considers the Brave Heart Edition to be “final” it is very much for those willing to experiment and perhaps take on board a little more risk than might otherwise be the case. If this doesn’t sound like you, the final production models are being targeted for March 2020.

Anyone looking to finally get their hands on an early release

  • The PinePhone Pre-order has Arrived

    Anyone looking to finally get their hands on an early release of the PinePhone, can now do so as of November 15.

    Created by Pine64, the PinePhone is an affordable Linux phone with a price tag of only $149.00. This phone is targeted at Linux enthusiasts and developers looking for privacy-centric open source software and hardware kill switches.

    The specs for the PinePhone are humble (to say the least). The device includes an Allwinner A64 1.2 GHz quad-core A53 CPU, 2GB of RAM and 16GB of storage, a 5.9” IPS LCD display, a 2MP front-facing camera and a 5MP rear-facing camera, a Mali 400 MP2 GPU, a 3000 mAh battery, and a USB C port.

The PinePhone Open Source Linux Smartphone Is Now Available

  • The PinePhone Open Source Linux Smartphone Is Now Available for Pre-Order

    Even though the road to bring us the PinePhone has been a bit bumpy for PINE64, mostly due to the issues encountered during the manufacturing process of the developer units, which turned out to become a good thing as the feedback received was very positive, the device is now ready for early adoption by the mass.

    Called the "Brave Heart" edition, this is the first batch of PinePhone units that will be delivered into the hands of regular people like you and me. And they're not an incomplete or rushed product as PINE64 did numerous in-house testing on the developer units and fixed all known and major bugs.

Anyone Can Pre-Order The Linux-Based Open-Source 'PinePhone'

  • Anyone Can Pre-Order The Linux-Based Open-Source 'PinePhone'

    PINE64’s PinePhone, the affordable Linux-based smartphone is now available for pre-order for everyone. Previously, the smartphone was available to developers and hackers only, who are quite satisfied with the phone so far.

    Despite being surrounded by manufacturing issues and “just good ‘ol bad luck”, PinePhone is finally being able to deliver to their promise. Currently, those who are interested in using a Linux-based phone can visit the PINE64 official store to pre-order the device for $149. PinePhone will start shipping in December.

Now you can buy a Linux smartphone for $150

  • Now you can buy a Linux smartphone for $150 (PinePhone BraveHeart developer/early adopter edition)

    Several companies are planning to ship Linux smartphones in the coming months. The PinePhone is by far the cheapest — and it could be one of the first to ship… if you’re OK spending money on a developer/early adopter edition phone.

    The PinePhone “BraveHeart” Limited Edition smartphone is now available for purchase for $150.

    It’s set to ship in late December or early January.

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