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IBM: OpenShift, Greenpeace greenwash, RHEL and Red Hat Insights

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Red Hat
  • OpenShift Developer experience feedback: Take the survey, join community sessions

    We’ve recently added several feedback loops aimed at increasing customer and community involvement in order to better understand how developers create, build, manage, test, and deploy their applications on and for Red Hat OpenShift.

  • Open by nature: What building a platform for activists taught me about playful development

    Participating in a design sprint with colleagues at Greenpeace reminded me of that. As I explained in the first two parts of this series, learning to think, plan, and work the open way is helping us build something truly great—a new, global platform for engaging activists who want to take action on behalf of our planet.

    The sprint experience (part of a collaboration with Red Hat) reinforced several lessons about openness I've learned throughout my career as an advocate for open source, an architect of change, and a community organizer.

  • What’s new in RHEL 8.1: Kernel patching, more Insights, and right on time

    Last week we celebrated the 25th anniversary of Red Hat’s inaugural Halloween release. This week? We’ve got Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 hitting the streets on schedule and ready to take on your toughest workloads. In RHEL 8.1 we have some new tools, live kernel patching, a new system role, and more. Here’s a quick preview of the highlights in RHEL 8.1.

  • What’s new in Red Hat Insights for November, 2019?

    For Red Hat Insights, 2019 has been an exceptional year. Insights provides proactive management and remediation guidance as a Software-as-a-Services (SaaS) solution, and this has become available as part of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) subscription to add new value to this already strong subscription. Our customers are showing their appreciation for this value as we can see in its robust growth in adoption. Since being announced at Red Hat Summit, we have continued to innovate on Insights and I want to update you on some key enhancements.

    [...]

    Once you register the Insights client, you can browse the rules section to see specific risks on your own environments. You can also look on a system-by-system basis to see which systems have matched these rules and most require your attention. As shown in the screenshot below, you can uncheck the "Show rules with hits" box at the top if you want to see the breadth of these 1,000+ rules, regardless of whether there is a match for them on your RHEL environments. (See Figure 1.)

Red Hat Ups the IQ of the Intelligent Operating System

  • Red Hat Ups the IQ of the Intelligent Operating System with the Latest Release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, the latest version of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform. The first minor release of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 enhances the manageability, security and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also adding new capabilities to drive developer innovation.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Officially Released

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 is here to deliver more intelligent management through enhanced automation, new enterprise-grade security enhancements, updated drivers for better hardware support, greater developer productivity, as well as yet another layer of performance enhancements to keep the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 operating system a reliable, stable, and secure platform for hybrid clouds and other enterprise environments.

    Highlights of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 include container-centric SELinux profiles to allow system administrators to create security policies that are more tailored to their needs for better control over container access of a host system's resources, such as compute, network, and storage, as well as application whitelisting, which lets sysadmins be more selective of the applications that are allowed to be launched on a machine, reducing the risk of malicious apps.

Red Hat announces RHEL 8.1 with predictable release cadence

  • Red Hat announces RHEL 8.1 with predictable release cadence

    Red Hat has just today announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1, promising improvements in manageability, security and performance.

    RHEL 8.1 will enhance the company’s open hybrid-cloud portfolio and continue to provide a consistent user experience between on-premises and public-cloud deployments.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Released With Kernel Live-Patching

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Released With Kernel Live-Patching Support

    Red Hat this morning announced the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, the first update to RHEL8 since its general availability in May.

    Arguably most notable with RHEL 8.1 is that kernel live-patching is now officially supported on RHEL for applying kernel security updates without reboots. This comes after Red Hat for years has worked on Kpatch and the in-kernel live-patching infrastructure.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Debuts With Added Developer Tools

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Debuts With Added Developer Tools, Security & Automation

    Red Hat, Inc. today announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, the latest version of the world's leading enterprise Linux platform. The first minor release of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 enhances the manageability, security and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also adding new capabilities to drive developer innovatio

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 adds live Linux kernel patching

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 adds live Linux kernel patching

    Six months after Red Hat released the most recent major update of its flagship operating system, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8, the first minor RHEL 8 release of the RHEL 8.1 brings significant improvements to manageability, security, and hybrid cloud performance.

    First and foremost, in my mind, RHEL 8.1 8.1 now has full support for live kernel patching. You can now update your Linux kernel for Critical or Important Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs) without needing to go to the trouble of a system reboot. This keeps your system up and running even serious security bugs are patched behind the scenes.

LWN

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 released

    Red Hat has announced the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1. This is the first update in what is planned to be a 6 month cadence for minor releases. The release notes contain more information.

How Red Hat is helping to drive accelerated AI

  • From the core to the edge: How Red Hat is helping to drive accelerated AI into the mainstream

    In the face of changing technology demands, local municipalities and federal governments alike can struggle to keep existing infrastructure operational while striving to meet the growing need to support their communities with advanced technologies. These can include 5G, artificial intelligence (AI) / machine learning (ML) and Internet of Things (IoT), all critical pieces that meet constituent demands for better, faster and more efficient services, but also come with steep IT requirements. 5G infrastructure alone necessitates an unprecedented physical footprint at a street and building level in order to serve the number of IoT devices anticipated to be operating on 5G networks. That number is projected to be as high as 1,000,000 devices per square kilometer (roughly the size of four city blocks).

    IoT and 5G technologies are key components in creating smart cities, where data from sensors, cameras, and specialized connected devices must be processed in real-time to provide insight and assistance with traffic congestion management, crime prevention, and asset and property maintenance. But smart cities are just one symptom of a growing challenge facing public sector organizations. The bigger question is: How do these organizations address the need for computing demand outside their core datacenter, at the literal edge of the network? Adding to this complexity is the proliferation of microservices-based, cloud native applications running on container management Kubernetes platforms, a wholesale sea of change in how traditional IT operations are conducted.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1 arrives with live kernel

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1 arrives with live kernel patching

    Red Hat has announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.1, the first point release since RHEL 8 launched back in May. While point releases in the Linux world don’t tend to bring big changes, RHEL 8.1 does. One of the key highlights with this update is the availability of live kernel patching, allowing systems to be updated without having to go offline for a reboot.

    Unlike some other operating systems, Linux rarely has to reboot for patches to be applied which is great for businesses that use Linux to run servers that need to be online for as much time as possible. One of the exceptions to this rule is kernel patches, they tend to require a whole system reboot to be applied but live kernel patching resolves this issue without a restart; this will help businesses to keep their services running around the clock.

Red Hat Linux 8.1, Now Generally Available, Adds New Automation

  • Red Hat Linux 8.1, Now Generally Available, Adds New Automation Capabilities

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 enhances the manageability, security and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also adding new capabilities to drive developer innovation.

    Red Hat, Inc., the provider of open source solutions, recently announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1.

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 comes with improved manageability, security, and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also combining innovative capabilities to accelerate developer innovation.

Red Hat Announces Latest Release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1

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  • Digging for license information with FOSSology

    For a number of years FOSSology was distributed and maintained by HP, until it became an LF project in 2015. It is easier for companies to collaborate on software in a project at an organization like the LF, he said, it makes for a safer harbor for competitors to work together—in Germany, at least. He works for Siemens AG, which is a rather large Germany company. Breaking up archive files into their constituent files—some of which may need to be unpacked themselves—then scanning the individual source and other files for their licenses is the basic task of FOSSology. It has a powerful license scanner, he said. Its web-based interface can then give an overview of the contents—which licenses apply to various parts of the tree, for example—and allow users to drill down into the file hierarchy to the individual files to see their copyrights and license-relevant text. When looking at the file, FOSSology highlights that license-relevant text and shows a comparison with the reference text of the license it has determined for the file. Determining the license that applies to a file is challenging, however. Files have a wide variety of license-relevant text in them, some of which is ambiguous. It depends on the kind of source code you are working with, but the scanner is unable to decide on a license for up to 30% of files it sees, so it is up to a human reviewer to tag the right license. It is then important to also track what reviewers decide on files in the FOSSology database. The Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) format is used to describe various things in a package, including licensing information. FOSSology can both import and export SPDX information, which allows exchanging information between two FOSSology users to share analysis work. FOSSology is one of a few tools that can consume SPDX information; it can be used to review what another party has concluded about the licensing of a code base. In addition, when a package gets updated, the previous analysis can be used as a starting point; the new dependencies and other changes can be incorporated into that rather than starting from scratch. [...] Huber handed the microphone back to Jaeger to wrap up the presentation. He said that FOSSology participated in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for 2019; the project had three GSoC participants working on various projects. FOSSology has been working on integrating with three different open-source projects as well. Software Heritage is a repository of published software, while ClearlyDefined is a repository of metadata about published software. In both cases, FOSSology has plans to interact with them via their REST APIs. The third project is not as well known, he said. Atarashi takes a new approach in scanning for licenses. Instead of using regular expressions and rules, it uses text statistics and information-retrieval techniques. Another initiative that the project has undertaken is FOSSology Slides, which is a site for gathering slides that can be used to talk and teach about FOSSology. They are all licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 (as are the slides [PDF] from the OSS EU talk). They can be used as is, or adapted for other uses; he encouraged anyone to contribute their FOSSology slides as well. One nice outcome of that is that some Japanese FOSSology users translated slides from FOSSology Slides to that language and contributed them back, Jaeger said. Other translations would be welcome for those who want to contribute to the project but are not software developers. A FOSSology user in the audience pointed out that the tool is only able to analyze the code it is given, so package dependencies have to be figured out separately. Jaeger agreed, noting that FOSSology is focused on understanding the licenses in the code it is given; there are other tools that can help figure out what the dependencies are and there are no plans to add that to FOSSology. He suggested the OSS Review Toolkit (ORT) as one possibility.